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What are you reading now?

Discussion in 'Book Lovers' started by Nandshyam, Mar 28, 2008.

  1. Thyagarajan

    Thyagarajan IL Hall of Fame

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    :hello:Thanks for your lovely heart warming jottings here.

    Yes you are very right. These were my collections over a few decades. Some of course are recent ones. That book by Mihir raj ... a different approach to love life ... viewed in a modern context offer newer impressive perspectives.

    One would like to have varieties in food of varying tastes. So also one’s selection for delectable enjoyment of mere reading. A few are to be studied in-depth. A second and third read, often offers better understanding of view points.
    Regards.
     
    Gauri03 likes this.
  2. Gauri03

    Gauri03 Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    A Woman Like Her by Sanam Maher:

    The book tells the story of Qandeel Baloch and the events leading to her honor killing at the hands of her brother. Baloch, born Fauzia Azeem gained notoriety as Pakistan’s first social media celebrity. An unabashed provocateur, she chased money and fame with a reckless zeal. The international media dubbed her the ‘Kim Kardashian of Pakistan’. The book is a quick read though the writing feels disjointed. The narrative skips around and often dwells too long on peripheral characters. In hindsight I would have skipped the book for an informative long form article instead.

    The most disconcerting aspect of reading this book was seeing my own conditioning laid bare. I have shed most of my cultural hang ups over the years, however the reluctance to flout convention remains deeply ingrained. I found myself split into two, a judgmental observer and a reluctant admirer. One part of me cringed at her foolhardiness — Facebook photos in lingerie; YouTube videos of herself writhing to suggestive songs — wondering why she would incur the wrath of the patriarchy? Didn’t she know that in the feudal frontiers of Pakistan her fate was sealed? Another part realizing that she probably did and chose her life despite it. Who's to say that a defiant gasp of freedom, though brief, is not worth more than decades of stifling conformity? Qandeel was a stage name that Fauzia chose for herself. She burned quick and bright, and with her death forced a conversation that led to the first tangible reform of the honor killing laws in Pakistan.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2021 at 5:38 AM
    Kohvachn and Thyagarajan like this.

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