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Risk - Type 2 diabetes - preventive measures ?

Discussion in 'Health Issues' started by MeenLoch, Sep 1, 2007.

  1. MeenLoch

    MeenLoch Silver IL'ite

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    My husband has a risk of type 2 diabetes ( family history). To add to the risk, he drinks sugar laden drinks,coke and ice creams.
    Are there easy, time tested preventive measures ?
    Are fenugreek seeds good for diabetes, eating them every mornign ?
     
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  2. Shanvy

    Shanvy IL Hall of Fame

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    Meenloch,

    If your husband has risk..he definitely has to control his sugar intake and go in for a better diet along with exercises.

    yes fenugreek seeds are very good. u can soak them and eat it along with the water.
    curry leaves, the tender ones are also good for diabetes (the type 2) when eaten raw.
     
  3. Anandchitra

    Anandchitra IL Hall of Fame

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    as far as i know diet and exercise are very important.
    regards
    anandchitra
     
  4. puni88

    puni88 Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    Give bitter gourd also....
     
  5. Shanvy

    Shanvy IL Hall of Fame

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    hi

    My greens vendor...told me that the variety..sukkaan keerai is very good for diabetes....it is a little sour..
     
  6. ramakrishna

    ramakrishna New IL'ite

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    Family History & Ethnic Background "Heridity increases the risk."
    Family history
    If a parent or sibling in your family has diabetes, your risk of developing Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes is increased.

    Ethnic Background
    People of some races are more prone to diabetes than others. It is not clear why, but the risk of diabetes is greater in Hispanics, African-Americans, Native Americans, Caucasians and Asians. Indians, too, are at a very high risk of developing diabetes
    Overweight
    "Being 20% overweight increases risk."
    If you are 20% or more over your optimal body weight, you increase your risk of developing diabetes. In fact 8 out of 10 adults with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. That's because the more fatty tissue you have, the more resistant your cells become to your own insulin.

    Also, your risk depends on how the weight is distributed on your body. If you have an "apple-shaped" body (extra weight in the upper part of your body especially around your abdomen) you're especially at a higher risk as compared to someone who has a "pear-shaped" body (extra fat around the hips and thighs). Women who gain even moderate amounts of weight - 5 to 10 kilograms- as young adults are at a higher risk of gestational diabetes.

    So if you are an overweight diabetic, the good news is that even a small weight loss can be beneficial in improving your blood glucose levels.
    Age & Inactivity
    "Increased risk over 45"
    Age
    If you're older than 45 years of age, your risk of Type 2 diabetes increases. Your risk of developing diabetes increases progressively as you get older. Also, as people grow older they tend to exercise less, lose muscle mass and gain weight. However, these days diabetes is occurring in younger people in their 30's and 40's.

    Inactivity
    If you are inactive, your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes greatly increases. Physical activity helps you control your weight, use up glucose, makes your cells less resistant and more sensitive to insulin, increases blood flow and improves circulation in even the smallest blood vessels (thereby preventing complications of diabetes). Exercise also helps build muscle mass. That's important because most of the glucose in your blood is absorbed into your muscles to provide energy. When you have less muscle tissue, more glucose stays in your blood
    The early signs of diabetes are: extreme thirst, hunger, frequent urination, tiredness, losing weight, or slow healing sores and bruises."

    Diabetes may manifest itself without symptoms. This is particularly seen in Type 2 diabetes, which develops very slowly, at times it may even take as many as 8 years for the condition to be diagnosed. Although symptoms may vary, the two most common symptoms invariably observed are increased thirst and frequent urination.

    Persistent high levels of blood glucose cause symptoms that may alert you to the development of diabetes. The early signs of diabetes are:

    Extreme thirst: The excess glucose circulating in your blood draws water from your tissues making you feel dehydrated.

    Extreme hunger: The feeling of hunger is there despite excess glucose in the blood because the cells are starving.

    Frequent urination: To quench your thirst you drink a lot of water and other drinks leading to frequent urination.

    Tiredness: Diabetes can sometimes present flu-like symptoms - fatigue, weakness and loss of appetite. That's simply because glucose does not reach the cells which utilize it as a fuel to provide energy- therefore the feeling of tiredness and weakness.

    Losing weight: You compensate for the lost fluids and sugar by eating more. But, still, you don't gain weight. Instead you lose weight. This is because despite excess glucose in the blood, the cells are starving and the muscle tissue does not have enough fuel for growth and energy. That's why most people with Type 1 diabetes are below their average weight.

    Slow healing sores and bruises: Your body's capacity to heal is affected in diabetes.

    Dry, itchy skin: If your blood glucose is high, your body loses fluid. With less fluid in your body, your skin can get dry.

    Numbness and / or tingling in feet: Excess glucose in your blood can damage the blood vessels that nourish your nerves, leading to a number of symptoms. The most common are tingling and loss of sensation in your hands and feet. You may also experience burning pain in your legs, feet, arms and hands.

    Blurry eyesight: High levels of blood glucose pull fluid out of the lenses of your eyes. This affects your ability to focus. Once your diabetes is treated and your blood levels drop, your vision should improve. Over a period of years, however, diabetes can also cause new blood vessels to form in your retina - the back part of your eye - as well as damage old vessels. For most people, this causes only mild vision problems. But for others, the effects may be much more serious. In some cases, diabetes can lead to blindness.

    Impotence in men: Because of the nerve damage caused by diabetes, more than half of men aged 50 and older, having diabetes, may experience some degree of sexual dysfunction from damage to the nerves that help produce an erection.

    Frequent infections: Diabetes increases the risk of infection in gums and in the bones that hold the teeth in place. As a result your gums may pull away from your teeth, your teeth may become loose, or you may develop sores or pockets of pus in your gums. Women experience frequent vaginal yeast infection.
    Type 1 Diabetes "Usually diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults."
    Once known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile diabetes, it is usually diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults, but it can appear at any age. Type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease. The body's immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas that then produces little or no insulin. People with Type 1 diabetes need daily injections of insulin to live. At present, scientists do not know exactly what causes the body's immune system to attack the beta cells, but they believe that both genetic factors and viruses are involved. People with Type 1 diabetes are usually lean in structure.
    While actual destruction may begin years earlier, symptoms appear when destruction reaches a critical level, and then they appear quickly.
    Symptoms include: Increased thirst Increased urination Constant hunger Weight loss Blurred vision Extreme tiredness
    If not diagnosed and treated with insulin, a person can lapse into a life-threatening coma.
    Treatment for Type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin shots or using an insulin pump, making wise food choices, exercising regularly, taking aspirin daily, and controlling blood lipids (fats like cholesterol and triglycerides) and high blood pressure.
    Type 2 Diabetes "Usually develops in adults over 40, common among adults over 55."
    The most common form of diabetes was once known as non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes. About 90 to 95% of people with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes. This form of diabetes usually develops in adults over the age of 40 and is most common among adults over age 55. About 80% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. This type of diabetes is also genetic in origin. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin or for some reason the muscle, liver or fat cells cannot use it effectively - because cells become resistant to insulin. It's not known why this happens, but excess weight and fatty tissue seem to be important factors. The end result is again an unhealthy build-up of glucose in the blood. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop gradually and are not as noticeable as in Type 1 diabetes.

    Symptoms include: Feeling tired or ill Frequent urination (especially at night) Unusual thirst Weight loss Blurred vision Frequent infections Slow healing of sores
    Treatment includes using taking diabetes medicines, eating sensibly, exercising regularly, taking aspirin daily and controlling blood pressure and cholesterol.
    Gestational Diabetes
    "Common among elder women with family history of diabetes."
    Gestational diabetes develops or is discovered during pregnancy, usually in the later stages. It is most common among elder women with a family history of diabetes mellitus. It affects between 2% and 5% of pregnant women and occurs when hormones produced by the placenta interfere with the action of insulin. Gestational diabetes disappears immediately after the baby is born, but about half of women who experience gestational diabetes develop Type 2 diabetes later in life. In rare cases, Type 1 diabetes also can develop during pregnancy, leading to high blood sugar levels after delivery that require insulin therapy.
    I Desirable blood glucose levels
    "Between 80 to 120mg/dL."
    Everyone's blood has some glucose in it. In people who don't have diabetes, the normal range is about 70 to 120mg/dL. Blood glucose goes up after eating but returns to the normal range 1 or 2 hours later.

    A desirable blood glucose range for most people with diabetes is from about 80 to 120mg/dL. This is before a meal--like before breakfast or 4 to 5 hours after the last meal. For most people, the target for 2 hours after a meal is 180mg/dL or less. Before bedtime, the blood glucose should be between 100 and 140mg/dL.



    ramakrishna Mythily
    Source - www.my.diabetovalens.com
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2007
  7. MeenLoch

    MeenLoch Silver IL'ite

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    Whoa,
    that s a great deal of information..Thanks.. usually as the article says, hereditary diabetes is of type 2 which again comes after 40. Prevention is better than cure.
    Thanks Mythili :)
     
  8. chitrajan

    chitrajan Bronze IL'ite

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    Hi,

    I am 40+ and am having Type II for the past 2 yrs - and my hubby has it for the past 14 yrs -- but it can be controlled with weight reduction and diet control.

    On the days he is having food with high sugar content, pls try to control the regular food. Never be super strict with food, because it willl lead to cravings and bingeing. So all food in moderation and brisk walking will help a lot.

    As far as I know, uncontrolled diabetes affects eyesight and kidneys. So it is better to take care as soon as you get it and enjoy life.
     
  9. MeenLoch

    MeenLoch Silver IL'ite

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    In hunt for information, I learned that, sunflower seeds in the night increases glucose tolerance levels. Also 8 solid hours of sleep helps preventing diabetes.
    Isnt banana and grapes a must no for diabetes prone people ?
    What else has ur doctors asked u to avoid ?
     
  10. Anandchitra

    Anandchitra IL Hall of Fame

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    what do you mean increase glucose tolerant level? you mean its good?
     

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