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Monosodium glutamate /tasting salt(MSG): Is it harmful?

Discussion in 'Andhra Pradesh' started by narra, Nov 9, 2009.

  1. narra

    narra Silver IL'ite

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    hi , here is the information on msg or chinese salt or tasting salt.

    i think most of the people heard about chinese salt. As far as I know, indian food doesnt use any MSG, Unless may be you order what is called "Indian chinese" which has fried rice,noodles,gobi manchuria etc... No Indian dish calls for MSG.

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor enhancer commonly added to Chinese food, canned vegetables, soups and processed meats. Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified MSG as a food ingredient that is "generally recognized as safe," the use of MSG remains controversial.
    MSG has been used as a food additive for decades. Over the years, the FDA has received many anecdotal reports of adverse reactions to foods containing MSG. But subsequent research found no definitive evidence of a link between MSG and the symptoms that some people described after eating food containing MSG. As a result, MSG is still added to some foods.
    A comprehensive review of all available scientific data on glutamate safety sponsored by the FDA in 1995 reaffirmed the safety of MSG when consumed at levels typically used in cooking and food manufacturing. The report found no evidence to suggest that MSG contributes to any long-term health problems, such as Alzheimer's disease. But it did acknowledge that some people may have short-term reactions to MSG. These reactions — known as MSG symptom complex — may include:
    • Headache, sometimes called MSG headache
    • Flushing
    • Sweating
    • Sense of facial pressure or tightness
    • Numbness, tingling or burning in or around the mouth
    • Rapid, fluttering heartbeats (heart palpitations)
    • Chest pain
    • Shortness of breath
    • Nausea
    • Weakness
    Symptoms are usually mild and don't require treatment. However, some people report more severe reactions. The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG. When MSG is added to food, the FDA requires that "monosodium glutamate" be listed on the label — or on the menu, in restaurants.
    if you need more information click on this link:

    Monosodium Glutamate: Bad for your brain, your figure, and your health | Nikas Culinaria


    thankyou
     
  2. tashidelek2002

    tashidelek2002 IL Hall of Fame

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    MSG is very bad for people and a real contributor to migraine and other headaches. Indian diet is full of MSG: Ajinomoto powder is MSG, Maggi noodles are full of it, and MSG is used the processing of soy protein items.

    Excuse me but MSG is not always listed on the labels of foods. If it is part of the processing of an item such as soy protein it can be omitted from the listing.
     
  3. skalluri

    skalluri Gold IL'ite

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    OH.. I never know this. thanks for sharing important information.

    Sujatha.
     
  4. satin

    satin Silver IL'ite

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    All noodles(maggi,top ramen) have msg in it and my Ob/Gyn has told me to avoid chinese foods till my delivery and needless to say I am a die-hard chinese food fan but have limited going to chinese restaurants as they add msg in all their foods.
     
  5. narra

    narra Silver IL'ite

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    one of my cousin who is studying hotel management said/tasting salt/chinese salt/ made from snake bones. how far its true?
     
  6. chaitusri

    chaitusri Silver IL'ite

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    Hi Narra,

    You have shared very important information.

    In INDIA few house wives use it in regular food preparations.Especially in Birayni, they feel it adds taste to their recipes.


    Caterers and cheffs use it more often to isolate the food taste.
     
  7. sritas

    sritas Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    Narra, Thanks for sharing such an important information and made from snake bone??????????? if true then ............
    Shanta
     
  8. narra

    narra Silver IL'ite

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    Last edited: Apr 30, 2010
  9. chaitusri

    chaitusri Silver IL'ite

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    I found another intresting article about MSG


    <CENTER>
    [SIZE=+2]How is MSG manufactured?[/SIZE]</CENTER>
    Processed free glutamic acid (MSG) is created when protein is either partially or fully broken apart into its constituent amino acids, or glutamic acid is secreted from selected bacteria. A protein can be broken into its constituent amino acids in a number of ways (autolysis, hydrolysis, enzymolysis, and/or fermentation). In general, these processes are referred to as "hydrolyzation" of protein. When a protein is hydrolyzed, the amino acid chains in the protein are broken, and individual amino acids are freed. Acids, enzymes, and/or fermentation processes are used to hydrolyze protein. These processes are discussed in some detail in food encyclopedias -- wherein articles on glutamic acid and "monosodium glutamate" are generally written by persons who work for Ajinomoto, Co., Inc., the world's largest producer of the food ingredient "monosodium glutamate."
    Today, the glutamic acid component of the food additive "monosodium glutamate" is generally made by bacterial or microbial fermentation wherein bacteria used are often, if not always, genetically engineered. In this method, bacteria are grown aerobically in a liquid nutrient medium. The bacteria have the ability to excrete glutamic acid they synthesize outside of their cell membrane into the liquid nutrient medium in which they are grown. The glutamic acid is then separated from the fermentation broth by filtration, concentration, acidification, and crystallization, and, through the addition of sodium, converted to its monosodium salt.
    According to The Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients:
    "Monosodium glutamate can generally be produced by three methods: (1) hydrolysis of proteins such as gluten or proteins present in sugar beet wastes, (2) synthesis, and (3) microbial fermentation. In the hydrolysis method, the protein is hydrolyzed with a strong mineral acid to free amino acids, and the glutamic acid is then separated from the mixture, purified, and converted to its monosodium salt, [monosodium glutamate]. This used to be the major method of [monosodium glutamate] manufacture. Currently most of the world production of [monosodium glutamate] is by bacterial fermentation. In this method bacteria (especially strains of Micrococcus glutamicus) are grown aerobically in a liquid nutrient medium containing a carbon source (e.g., dextrose or citrate), a nitrogen source such as ammonium ions or urea, and mineral ions and growth factors. The bacteria selected for this process have the ability to excrete glutamic acid they synthesize outside of their cell membrane into the medium and accumulate there. The glutamic acid is separated from the fermentation broth by filtration, concentration, acidification, and crystallization, followed by conversion to its monosodium salt [monosodium glutamate]." (Leung, A. and Foster, S. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs , and Cosmetics. New York: Wiley, 1996. pp 373-375.)​
    Creating processed free glutamic acid (MSG) by bacterial fermentation is not openly discussed by the glutamate industry, and it is not generally discussed in detail in food encyclopedias. It seems strange to us that when Ajinomoto discusses the way in which "monosodium glutamate" is manufactured, they talk about it being made from beets, corn, or some other crop, instead of describing their use of bacteria (which may be genetically engineered) and their process of bacterial fermentation.

    It used to be that when any ingredient contained 78%-79% processed free glutamic acid (MSG), and the balance was made up of salt, moisture, and up to 1 per cent impurities, the product had to be called "monosodium glutamate" and had to be labeled as such. The FDA required that other MSG-containing ingredients be identified by names other than "monosodium glutamate." Never has the FDA required mention of the fact that an ingredient contains processed free glutamic acid (MSG). Presently, the FDA refers to the 6th edition of the Food Chemical Codex for their definition of "monosodium glutamate."
    While the glutamic acid in "monosodium glutamate" is generally produced through bacterial fermentation, the glutamic acid in the other MSG-containing ingredients is made through use of chemicals (hydrolysis or autolysis), enzymes (enzymolysis), fermentation, or a complex cooking process wherein [FONT=Times New Roman,Times]reaction flavors are produced from a combination of specific amino acids, reducing sugars, animal or vegetable fats or oils, and optional ingredients including hydrolyzed vegetable protein.[/FONT]
    In acid hydrolysis, crude gluten or other proteinaceous starting materials are generally hydrolyzed by heating with hydrochloric acid. The chemical hydrolysis with hydrochloric acid is said to be efficient, but almost any organic substance in the raw material is hydrolyzed, resulting in desired reactions such as hydrolysis of proteins, carbohydrates, fats (triglycerides), and the unwanted formation of mono and dichloro propanols, which are carcinogenic. The FDA has admitted, and even pretended to address the fact, that processed free glutamic acid created by acid hydrolysis contains carcinogenic mono and dichloro propanol ( Food Chemical News, December 2, 1996. Pp.24-25).
    The FDA has also admitted that processed free glutamic acid found in reaction flavors which are produced from a combination of specific amino acids, reducing sugars, and animal or vegetable fats or oils, and optional ingredients including hydrolyzed vegetable protein is also carcinogenic (Lin, L.J. Regulatory status of Maillard reaction flavors. Division of Food and Color Additives, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, FDA. August 24, 1992; Food Chemical News. May 31, 1993, p 16).
    Processed free glutamic acid (MSG) carries with it material not found with unprocessed glutamic acid. Unprocessed glutamic acid in higher organisms is L-glutamic acid, only. Processed free glutamic acid (MSG) is both L-glutamic acid and D-glutamic acid, and is accompanied by pyroglutamic acid and other impurities. The impurities differ according to the materials and methods used to produce the glutamic acid. Under certain circumstances, processed free glutamic acid is accompanied by mono and dichloro propanols (which are carcinogenic) or heterocyclic amines (which are also carcinogenic). By FDA definition, processed free glutamic acid (MSG) is "naturally occurring," because the basic ingredient is found in nature. "Naturally occurring" does not mean that a food additive is being used in its natural state. "Naturally occurring" only means that the food additive began with something found in nature. By FDA definition, the ingredient "monosodium glutamate" is natural. So is hydrochloric acid. So is arsenic. "Natural" doesn't mean "safe."
    There are a number of straightforward bold faced lies used by the glutamate industry in defending its contention that exposure to free glutamic acid found in processed food does not cause adverse reactions including hives, asthma, seizures, and migraine headache; could not possibly cause brain damage, learning disorders, or endocrine disturbances; and could not possibly be relevant to diverse diseases of the central nervous system such as addiction, stroke, epilepsy, schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, and degenerative disorders such as ALS, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Central to their argument is the lie that the processed free glutamic acid used in processed food is identical to the glutamic acid found in unprocessed, unadulterated food and in the human body.
     
  10. chaitusri

    chaitusri Silver IL'ite

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    http://www.ajinomoto.com/csr/pdf/e-p5-14.pdf


    Around 1917, a rumor was circulated that​
    AJI-NO-MOTO​
    ® was made from snakes. At
    the time, the product was being made from
    wheat fl our, and the snake rumor was simply
    groundless. Suzuki & Co., the forerunner of
    Ajinomoto Co., Inc., ran a newspaper advertisement
    denying the claim, but ending the

    rumor was diffi cult once it had spread.
     

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