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Middle School Education In The Us

Discussion in 'General Discussions - USA & Canada' started by BhumiBabe, Apr 13, 2017.

  1. sokanasanah

    sokanasanah IL Hall of Fame

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    Actually doable, in principle, with open-source text-mining and semantic search packages in R or Python, but I am too lazy. I don't even track what I post. I often find myself wondering whether I have already said this or that somewhere!
     
  2. Rihana

    Rihana Finest Post Winner

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    Now you are talking like a manager. : ) Yes, it is technically doable. But, in the nature of discussion that takes place on such topic, an index is not feasible. In fact, providing an index might make parent not read some material that would help him/her.
     
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  3. sokanasanah

    sokanasanah IL Hall of Fame

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    So, you're asking me to do your homework for you?:lol: Just kidding.
    What I meant was this:
    It ought to come as a revelation that a mere 1525 words are sufficient to open up an entire world to you. Words are the bricks, and of course, you need some mortar as well. Corpora for most languages (including English) are freely available. I alluded to this before and provided a word-list as an Excel sheet (5000 words I think?) a few years ago on IL, when I was a substitute 'teacher' of English for a brief while.

    As for general principles, and some (ahem, more detailed) suggestions as to how, we can discuss that later. Gotta run!
     
  4. sokanasanah

    sokanasanah IL Hall of Fame

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    Yes, following the Prime Directive: "Nothing is too difficult for the man who doesn't have to do it himself."
    :roflmao:
     
  5. jayasala42

    jayasala42 IL Hall of Fame

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    Dear Rihana,
    I don't know how to respond.I am so much amazed with admiration with your depth of knowledge and thorough understanding on the subject.I have forwarded the entire set of responses onthe above subject to my son and DIL in US whose son is in 7th class.
    I don't know whether we did any such research while our children were in middle school.Everything is a routine in India whereas in Us people do a lot of research and consultation that helps a lot.
    Doing with basic understanding strengthens our conviction.

    Jayasala 42
     
  6. Laks09

    Laks09 Staff Member Finest Post Winner

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    Middle Schoolers and Mathematics

    Per @Rihana'S request. My teaching knowledge is limited to the maths tuitions I took during college to help with pocket money, so please take it with a heap of salt.

    Ideally, the teaching relationship with the child should be something like mentoring. After the basics are taught, the child should try to problem solve and find ways to think and come up with solutions. Initially, in a haste to teach her everything, I over did it. I had to learn to scale back starting in the fifth grade.
    I think a lot depends on the child and how much of a help she needs and also the teachers. My daughter did well when the teachers were phenomenal and touched upon all the basics even if all but two kids already knew it all from tutoring. Sometimes we just have to supplement at home. I remember she came out of the 8th grade knowing applications very well but the basics weren't good. I did go back and re-work on some basics from MS this year(thanks to the advice of an ILite).
    I generally buy a couple of text books online for the year and go through them when I find the time. The textbooks have a lot of self work questions beginning at an easy level and working up to advanced questions. Based on this I would make work sheets for her(copy questions from here and make worksheets). Do start in summer and do the basic ground work for the first semester of school. I usually let her lounge around and play club all summer long and then come fall it's all haywire when the teacher isn't cutting it.
    There are parents who save their kids worksheets and text book etc. It's very helpful to get the worksheets from school but if you don't find any then just create some. I would also google and get a ton of worksheets to work with her. Most worksheets for math topics without solutions can be found free online.
    The more they practice and make errors and fix it themselves, the better they get.
    I have limited my working with her to just help when she gets stuck but I think it might be better to have some basics covered. This summer I plan to redo some basics again. I also have to teach comp sc this summer. Let's see how much I accomplish!
     
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  7. Umanga

    Umanga Gold IL'ite

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  8. Rihana

    Rihana Finest Post Winner

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    I glanced at the website. Lots of information there. I don't know how I soon zeroed in on this question and answer:

    If I am paying almost $9K annually, I would want my child to learn at least SAT level math at the school as a given. SAT I Math, and SAT subject test Math Level II.
     
  9. Umanga

    Umanga Gold IL'ite

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    That would run counter to the school's philosophy. They are not trying to actively teach anything. The school holds that children have an innate capacity to teach themselves through play with other children of all ages and when help is required, to approach adults. The kids do what they want. Those that need structure, create it. Those that don't, don't. They can indulge any interest they have. They are not forced into doing anything. They naturally discover what they are interested in by interacting with the environment, other children of different ages, adults, computers, musical instruments and the various materials and artefacts that the school has. One of the main insights from Peter Gray's writings is that children naturally sort themselves into multi-age groups. This allows the younger children to learn from the old and it allows the older children to nurture and lead the younger ones. Formal schooling stifles this instinct by sorting children into groups of the same age. This is quite unnatural I think. The school also provides a lot of physical space for children to explore which I think is essential for discovering their interests. It also allows them to develop properly.

    Self Directed Learning, Unschooling, Child Centered, Democratic Schools.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2017
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  10. Rihana

    Rihana Finest Post Winner

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    True that.

    I was thinking it is like a Montessori style but for older kids. Went to Wikipedia, and looks like contrary to my assumption, Montessori way of teaching (learning?) is not only for preschools.

    I still think I'd like my child to leave such a high school having learned the levels of math I mentioned rather than with the ability to learn them if/when needed. I consider those as basic necessities for further studies in any area and also to "explore" other subjects in high school. (algebra, geometry, and a little bit of trig. or pre-calc).
     

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