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Kite Runner

Discussion in 'Book Lovers' started by Cheeniya, Dec 29, 2018.

  1. Cheeniya

    Cheeniya Super Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    Khaled Hosseini, an Afghan-American physician turned novelist writes about how quickly life can change, one moment can completely change the track for an entire lifespan. It is hard to believe that Kite Runner is the debut novel of Hosseini and he wrote it when he was just 38. He is a brilliant writer who can craft a realistic image of his home country through his tale of the life of a boy driven out of his country by betrayal and war, narrating the fall of what would be a prosperous country and the bitter communal conflicts.

    Amir is young Afghani boy living in the Wazir Akbar Khan district of Kabul in the 1970s. He is the son of a businessman and philanthropist, and Amir spends his childhood trying to live up to his father’s expectations. Unfortunately, he is everything that his father does not want him to be; instead of sports he reads and writes and he can face conflicts only because he is usually defended by his best friend and house servant Hassan. The two boys share an inseparable bond despite being separated by ethnic groups, Amir being Pashtun and Hassan being Hazara.

    The story takes nail-biting twists and turns, briefly adopting Dan Brown’s story-telling style. The final chapters, however, lack Brown’s finish, as the plot once again takes on a darker nature. Amir succeeds in liberating the young boy and bringing him to America, only to watch helplessly as the boy becomes suicidal and silent. He longs for his old life which Amir is unable to offer him, and the very life Amir may be responsible for ruining.

    As Hosseini brings the novel to a close, his conclusions are explained in an old Zendagi Minzara saying: "Life goes on, unmindful of beginning or end… crisis or catharsis, moving forward like a slow dusty caravan of kochis."

    Hosseini may have achieved a political goal by humanising a region still obscure in Western thought. He describes Afghanistan and its inhabitants as once a very modern, before outside forces rendered the nation a war-torn catastrophe. However, war and political conflict take the back seat to the human dramas that occur because of and more importantly, despite of such events. The author’s simple language is surprisingly effective in explaining the complexity of emotions, characters and dynamics which could exist in any culture.
     
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  2. Amulet

    Amulet Platinum IL'ite

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    Sankaranthi day in Gujarat is the kite flying day. On one such day, Amitabh Bachchan was on a terrace flying a kite. His was cut, and there was a stampede to get at that souvenir.

    I've heard that boys can no longer fly kites in Chennai city (true?).

    Kite Runner, the book, and then the movie, got the culture of the Afghanis a little more exposure in the west. Not all good. The boy Amir's experience, and its ramifications were analyzed in the west. The west got to know about the "Bacha bazi" practice of the wealthy, and powerful Afghanis.
     
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  3. Srama

    Srama Finest Post Winner

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    Dear Cheeniya Sir,

    I first read his "A Thousand Splendid Suns" before I read The Kite Runner. Perhaps doing that did not leave an impression like the Thousand Suns did or perhaps the woman in me! I did have an opportunity to meet him when he visited our area and have an autographed book even! There is no doubt he is a good story teller but I have not kept up with him at all, after that. Thanks to you, now I have to go find that autographed copy :)
     
  4. satchitananda

    satchitananda Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    I read this book, CS. Yes, it is a very gripping though very disturbing story. Watched the movie too, though as expected it lacks the impact of the book.
     
  5. shyamala1234

    shyamala1234 Platinum IL'ite

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    Of all the three books I r
    Of all the three books of Hosseini I like Kite Runner the best.
    Syamala
     
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  6. Amulet

    Amulet Platinum IL'ite

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  7. Cheeniya

    Cheeniya Super Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    @Amulet
    For those who missed tis specacle, here it is
    Partly true. Using abrasive threads called 'manja' thread is banned. But it still goes on. See this Amazon ad.
     
  8. Cheeniya

    Cheeniya Super Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    @Srama
    My dear sabi
    My Professor Google tells me:
    The title of the book comes from a line in the Josephine Davis translation of the poem "Kabul",by the 17th-century Iranian poet Saib Tabrizi:

    "Every street of Kabul is enthralling to the eye
    Through the bazaars, caravans of Egypt pass
    One could not count the moons that shimmer on her roofs
    And the thousand splendid suns that hide behind her walls"

    It is another great book by the writer. I read his Kite Runner as soon as it hit the Indian market.
    That makes him the second to have that honour the first being ofcourse Richard Bach. You did not read Khaled Hosseini further probably because of your deep obsession with Richard Bach. Khaled is far too earthly!
    Sri
     
  9. ashima10

    ashima10 Platinum IL'ite

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    This was the book which was given by my friend in those Delhi university days...

    I dont remember which part now...there was a point my jaw fell reading it..i was so moved ...that for a moment i had to close the book...cry my heart out ...wipe my tears and start reading again.( thankfully i was alone )

    its still with me...want to read it again...but i have like 3 unfinished books to be done with...god knows when i can read again.

    I read then "thousand splendid suns " ,was doing masters at that time...and i remember when the character Traiq was suppose to be dead/dying..I had the same feeling of shutting up and crying..and i was in class ...a friend of mine sitting by was unable to comprehend my emotions...started joking with me so that my face can change.

    I finally had to shout to her to let me cry because a character in the book is dying...and i NEED to mourn. she is still terrified of me.

    unfortunately i lost the interest in Khalied hosseini ( he is brilliant i agree ) when i read the third book..."when the mountain echoes".....not that captivating and the crux was almost similar to previous too.

    thanks cheeniya...wish to ahve my book days and enthusiasm back :)

    All in all...Kite runner was gem....i want to read it again.
    Sorry got diverted ...
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2018
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  10. Cheeniya

    Cheeniya Super Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    @satchitananda
    Khaled Hosseini is not required at all to prove that we have identical tastes!
     
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