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34 weeks pregnant

Discussion in 'Pregnancy & Labor' started by desiprincess, Feb 17, 2007.

  1. desiprincess

    desiprincess Senior IL'ite

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    Hello ladies

    I am 34 weeks pregnant, and this is my first baby. I have a lot of anxiety thinking about labor and delivery. Any suggestions on how to calm my fears? thanks

    princess
     
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  2. tejudatla

    tejudatla Bronze IL'ite

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    Dear Desiprincess,

    FIRST OF ALL MY HEARTFUL CONGRATULATIONS TO YOU !!!!

    From now on you may begin to notice changes in your body that are commonly recognized as signs of impending labor. During a first pregnancy, the baby may “drop,” or engage in the birth canal 2 to 3 weeks before labor begins. In my case my baby was n't dropped at all.

    You may suddenly feel as though you can breathe more easily, though the increased pressure on your bladder may also cause you to urinate more frequently. In subsequent pregnancies, this “lightening” may occur only a few hours before labor.

    The irregular contractions you may have experienced throughout your pregnancy or the third trimester may increase in frequency and intensity. Hours to days before labor, the small mucus “plug” that has sealed your cervix throughout pregnancy may begin to stretch, then break apart as the cervix shortens and thins out in a process called “effacing.” Once this occurs, pink-tinged mucus, or “bloody show,” may be discharged from your vagina.

    When you notice these signals, you should begin to finalize plans like arrange your transportation to the hospital, and call your doctor for last-minute instructions. Pack a small suitcase, placing any items you will need during labor in a separate bag. Continue to practice any breathing techniques you may have learned during childbirth preparation or Lamaze classes. They can help to distract you from pain and relax you during labor. I haven't learned the breathing techniques and during the delivary time I was just pushing with my mouth only and it was completely wrong.
    If you have already learned how to push it sure will definitely helpful for easy delivary...

    One additional sign often indicates that labor is imminent. The downward pressure of the baby's head against the amniotic sac may cause these membranes to rupture. The breaking of your “water” can occur as a trickle or a gush of odorless, colorless amniotic fluid. Alert your medical attendants as soon as this happens. Once the sac has broken, labor is imminent, often beginning spontaneously within 12 to 24 hours. In fact, in many women, the membranes don't rupture until labor is already underway. In my case I had water break down and it continued for every 5 min....


    Once your water breaks, keep your vagina clean to minimize the risk of infection. Don't take a bath. Be prepared to describe when and how the membranes ruptured, and also be alert to any discoloration of the fluid—from yellow or tan to brown or green. This indicates the presence of meconium, a waste product discharged by your baby's bowels, which can be an indicator of fetal distress.....

    Your uterus is a powerful muscle that tightens and relaxes rhythmically during labor, allowing the cervix to stretch open and help to push your baby through the birth canal. Although every woman's labor is different, at the outset, you may begin to feel a pattern of dull cramps similar to menstrual cramps in your lower back or pelvis. If these remain regular for an hour or more, last at least 30 seconds, and gradually increase in intensity—even if you change position or move around—your labor has begun....

    Your physician will probably have given you some guidelines about when to contact him or her once labor begins. If this is your first pregnancy, stay home awhile, so you can relax and remain unencumbered by the hospital routine and environment. Take a walk, catch a nap, enjoy a long shower, sip liquids (clear liquids only), read a book, or engage in any activity that will entertain and distract you and allow you to preserve your energy. Most physicians recommend that during a first labor, a woman wait until contractions are five minutes apart for an hour before coming to the hospital or birth center. In subsequent pregnancies, you may be advised to come sooner, since your labor can progress much more quickly.
    You should contact your physician immediately if you notice any vaginal bleeding other than the pinkish “show,” if the baby doesn't move for an unusually long time, or if you have constant, severe pain rather than intermittent contractions. These signs can indicate such potentially serious conditions as placenta previa, in which the placenta may be blocking the exit from the uterus, or placental abruption, in which the placenta begins to prematurely separate from the uterus and limit the baby's oxygen supply. If your physician suspects any complications, you'll be asked to come to the birth center as quickly as possible so your condition can be checked and your baby can be monitored throughout the remainder of your labor.

    Hope this helps and be relax and have a safe delivary and there is nothing to worry about....

    Love
    Tej:wave
     
  3. desiprincess

    desiprincess Senior IL'ite

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    Thank you so much for ur input Teja. I have a question, can the doctor tell us exactly after doing a internal exam, when the baby is going to be born? Thanks

    Princess
     
  4. tejudatla

    tejudatla Bronze IL'ite

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    Dear Princess,

    After you are admitted to the hospital, your physician, nurse or birth attendant will want to discuss the events leading to labor. Your vital signs will be checked and recorded, and special attention will be paid to your baby's fetal heart tones and fetal heart rate (FHR), both important indicators of the baby's response to the stress of childbirth. You will be asked when you last ate and how much you consumed. Be sure to tell your physician if you want your partner or your mil or your mom to be present at the delivery, or if you have made any other special arrangements.

    Unless there's concern about complications such as placenta previa or the risk of infection, your doctor will perform a vaginal examination to check the baby's position, the dimensions of your pelvis, and the effacement and dilation of your cervix. A blood sample may be taken and a urine specimen may be tested for protein....

    Depending on the status of your labor, your baby's position and heart rate, and additional factors such as a previous cesarean delivery or a post-term pregnancy, your physician may recommend electronic fetal monitoring now or at some point during your labor. Many hospitals routinely use external electronic FHR monitoring for 20 to 30 minutes after admission to establish the baby's baseline heart rate and check variations, such as beating slower during uterine contractions. If you need fetal monitoring, the doctor or birth attendant will place two belts around your abdomen to hold two small monitoring instruments in place.
    Once your membranes have ruptured, the baby can be monitored internally with a small electrode threaded through your vagina. At the same time, if there's any question about the force of labor, your doctor may place a small plastic tube, or catheter, in your uterus to measure the strength of your contractions.

    Numerous studies comparing continuous FHR monitoring and listening to the baby's heart rate with a stethoscope or other device have shown little difference in detecting fetal distress during labor in an otherwise uneventful pregnancy. If your baby's heart rate is normal and your labor is progressing steadily, continuous monitoring is probably unnecessary—and unduly restrictive. Instead, your birth attendant should encourage you to walk around, lean against your partner, urinate when necessary or simply change positions to stay as comfortable as possible.
    Occasional intervals of FHR monitoring may still be recommended throughout labor. You will need continuous monitoring only if there are any signs of fetal distress, such as the presence of meconium-stained amniotic fluid, vaginal bleeding, a drop in your blood pressure, or an interruption in your cervical dilation despite regular contractions.

    For me, my Physician could n't tell the exact time because my baby wasn't come out n I couldn't push the baby out.... Finally I had an Epidural....

    I would like to suggest you one thing. If you can't bear the pains, you may ask your Physician for Anesthecia to relieve from pains. I think you are in States so you have this facility.

    Epidural anesthesia is one way of taking away the pain of labor and birth. Like most medical treatments it has its own risks and benefits. It is important that you understand those risks and benefits before deciding if an epidural is right for you. In my delivary time I also asked for the injection so that a larger needle is placed through the numbed area and into the epidural space of your spine.Once your baby is born, the catheter is removed. The effects of the anesthesia usually wear off completely in one or two hours....

    If you have any more questions feel free to ask...

    Love
    Tej:wave
     

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