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Will The Central Government Ever Stop Pushing Hindi On Tamil Nadu ?

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by Minion, Oct 18, 2020.

  1. stayblessed

    stayblessed Gold IL'ite

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    Yes you all are right. Hindi imposition is wrong. its against democracy and against unity in diversity. In some or the other form cg always forces hindi on the non hindi states. But only tamizh nadu puts up a vehement fight. If all the south indian states put up a united front the issue can be resolved. Hindi shouldn't be learned even as a third language in any school. If people wish they should go to private tuitions. Its unfair for the non hindi states. Previously too we have had discussions in this forum on the same topic.
     
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  2. shravs3

    shravs3 IL Hall of Fame

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    Y
    And so do Tamilians or any other non Hindi speaking state...
    PS- My mother tongue is definitely not Hindi :grinning:
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2020
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  3. Minion

    Minion Gold IL'ite

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    There is nothing wrong with that until you start to push your language on others and that’s what Hindi speaking people are doing
     
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  4. Hopikrishnan

    Hopikrishnan Silver IL'ite

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    Encroachment and eventual hegemony of a major language over others may happen from many directions. The use of latin script could be the thin edge of the wedge. Here is a world map where India is noted as a place where latin script exists alongside the original native script. Like writing Kannada or Hindi using English letters, as well as the letters of the respective languages. Phonetic typing on smart phones could be the insidious subliminal training. For a slow transition from a native script to the reconciliation to the latin script. The languages of the grey regions (in the map) seems to be more resistant to the incursions. India is in the same trouble as the greeks are.... younger, more tech-savvy populations are slowly moving to the use of English alphabets to write their language. Both India and Greece have ancient classic literatures. All could be lost to the future when the populations are unable to read the scripts. By Flrn using Canuckguy work - Image:Latin alphabet world distribution.png, Image:BlankMap-World6.svg, Public Domain, File:Latin alphabet world distribution.svg - Wikimedia Commons[​IMG]
    Current distribution of the Latin script:
    Dark Green:
    Countries where the Latin script is the sole main script
    Light Green: Countries where Latin co-exists with other scripts
    Latin-script alphabets are sometimes extensively used in areas coloured grey due to the use of unofficial second languages, such as French in Algeria and English in Egypt, and to Latin transliteration of the official script, such as pinyin in China.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2020
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  5. Minion

    Minion Gold IL'ite

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    Nice analysis, but first things first lets take care of the current threat "Hindi" invasion and then worry about others later.
     
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  6. Hopikrishnan

    Hopikrishnan Silver IL'ite

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    The political leaders of the non-Hindi regions of India, if their goal is to protect the cultural and linguistic heritage, should object to the Union Gov. not recognizing their language in communications with them, and correct this problem in the implementation rules.

    https://upload.indiacode.nic.in/showfile?actid=AC_CEN_5_39_00001_196319_1517807319151&type=rule&filename=OL Rule 1976.pdf

    The above is a summary of "RULES" to implement the 1963 Official Languages Act.... in Hindi and English. Currently operational in India. English version begins on page 9. India is divided into 3 regions for the purposes of Communications from the Union Government to State Governments in those regions.

    The leaders of the non-hindi region not individually named in the rules document (speaking Bengali, Assami, Manipuri, Naga, Oriya, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil etc. "The Group C") have been assigned English as the de facto Official Language in the rules of Communications from the Union Govt to these States, or persons in these States:

    1. Communications from a Central Government office :-
    a. to a State or Union Territory in Region "A" or to any office (not being a Central Government office) in such State or Union Territory shall ordinarily be in Hindi and if any communication is issued to any of them in English, it shall be accompanied by a Hindi translation thereof ; Provided that if any such State or Union Territory desires the communications of any particular class or category or those intended for any of its offices, to be sent for a period specified by the Government of the State or Union Territory concerned, in English, or in Hindi with a translation in the other language, such communication shall be sent in that manner ;

    b. to any person in a State or Union Territory of Region "B" may be either in Hindi or English.

    2. Communications from a Central Government office to State or Union Territory in Region "C" or to any office (not being a Central Government office) or person in such State shall be in English.

    3. Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-rules (1) and (2), communications from a Central Government office in Region "C" to a State or Union Territory of Region "A" or Region "B" or to any office (not being a Central Government office) or person in such State may be either in Hindi or in English. Provided that communications in Hindi shall be in such proportion as the Central Government may, having regard to the number of persons having working knowledge of Hindi in such offices, the facilities for sending communications in Hindi and matters incidental thereto determine from time to time.​
     
  7. sokanasanah

    sokanasanah IL Hall of Fame

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    No.
    This is exactly right. When passports were first developed, French was the international language of diplomacy. Retaining French in passports is diplomatic tradition.
    There are good reasons to learn Devanagari - it is a beautiful, logical, powerful, expressive script. However, the Hindi chauvinism is a bit much. I’ll do it in Sanskrit, thanks.

    Compared to Tamil, Hindustani/Hindi is a relatively new language, its modern form promoted in competition with Urdu - even though the term Zaban-e-Urdu itself dates only from the late 18th century. One has to keep in mind that the Hindi being taught/promoted has itself turned its back on its own history, spurned its legacy. Pretty much all the Hindi literature taught today is barely a couple of hundred years old, although Kharboli, Awadhi, Chattisgarhi, Bundeli etc. have a much older heritage, and Hindustani older than those. Premchand wrote his early stories in Urdu.

    Tamizh is a classical language, from an independent branch of the language tree - Dravidian as opposed to Indo-European, and as such, rivals Sanskrit as a treasure of the Indian heritage. There is simply no reason to back off and give up Tamizh, no matter what self-important and dare I say, ignorant, politicians may think. Tamizh has an unbroken tradition of language, literature, and culture that Hindi does not. No political or geographic justifications are necessary.

    And yes, I am fluent in Tamizh and Hindi (& enjoy it) and get by in Sanskrit, but when it comes to this notion of Hindi as a "national language", I say NoMo NaMo.
    :smash2::icon_pc::grinning-smiley-048:
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2020
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  8. SGBV

    SGBV Finest Post Winner

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    Seriously???
    When it comes to India, learning a new language is not an abuse, but the same is an abuse if that happens to other Tamils living out of India. Wow :) Perceptions.....
    FYI, all the documents in Sri Lanka, including personal documents like PP or national ID card is printed in 3 languages (English, Tamil and Sinhalese). Every bus, public places displays the same too.

    PS: The above statement is NOT in anyway glorifying Sri lanka or undermining their ethnic tragedy of the past. It is just as it is.

    Everyone has problems. To be precise every minority (be it race, religion, ethnicity, tribe, class or whatever) have their own problems. But what matter is how we pick our battles, and face it strategically. JMO
     
  9. Swetha52003

    Swetha52003 Silver IL'ite

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    SGBV, you really need to calm down. This thread is not about Srilanka or the horrific tragedy happened there. This thread is about the Indian central government pushing Hindi to the non Hindi speaking South Indian states. Please move on..
     
  10. SGBV

    SGBV Finest Post Winner

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    I am an outsider, and I don't know my eligibility to comment here.
    But just thought of giving my 2 cents, and I leave the judgement to the OP and mods regarding my comment.

    Hindi is a language, which is widely spoken in India, not only in the north, but also in some parts of the south as a connecting language between the states.
    I have many Indian friends work for the UN internationally. Whenever they see a fellow Indian (regardless of the state) they feel connected, and the friendship starts instantly.
    That's what happens when you are in a foreign land living with different nationals.
    It feels so Indian when they communicate in Hindi about their very Indian problems without having to reveal the same to others.
    But most of our Tamil friends have an issue, as they don't speak Hindi, yet feel disconnected from the main Indian group.

    This is just my observation only.

    In my opinion, learning a new language, that too a widely spoken language of our country is always an asset.
    It gives you exposure, and a chance to interact with many others to learn and unlearn many many things.
    I am learning Hindi, though I don't need to. But I feel it can be helpful with many of my subcontinent friends, as some Pakistanis and Nepalis can speak in Hindi, while some Bangladeshis can understand the same.
    It is becoming a regional connect, and really helpful when you are in a foreign land.

    On the other hand, we eagerly learn English and French despite of the fact that they encroached and enforced these languages on us many years before. We think it is a pride to learn and speak in English.
    Then, why can't we learn a sister language?????
     

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