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Will The Central Government Ever Stop Pushing Hindi On Tamil Nadu ?

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by Minion, Oct 18, 2020.

  1. shravs3

    shravs3 IL Hall of Fame

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    Each language is beautiful in its own way. According to me there is no one language above the other...
    Obviously everyone has their first preference to mother tongue.

    If people are interested to learn any language they should be just willing to learn themselves instead of forcing them to learn a particular language..

    And obviously if you goto a state which has different language then atleast it’s good to learn or atleast attempt to speak instead of just conversing in your own language.

    Bangalore is especially flexible with languages compared to other cities and states. Almost every Bangalorean knows minimum 5 languages.

    So if it’s some Hindi guy definitely the local guy replies in Hindi.. That’s when those people show no interest to learn the local language.

    Now things are changing in Bangalore too because of all the Kannada sanghas.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020
  2. Minion

    Minion Gold IL'ite

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    Agathinai

    If indeed what the government had been saying or been allocating all the budget money to this language and it eventually happens-we are actually living a dream. I don’t believe in such dreams and I don’t believe what the government is saying is so truthful. Take everything with a pinch of salt what they say inbudgets. I never said to ignore local languages either

    Let’s not use that as an excuse to diminish the reality, let’s stick to the number at the face value and continue with the discussion.
     
  3. Laks09

    Laks09 Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    The Vedas etc are extra curricular religious activities. That’s not the school’s job. It’s the parents job to instill religion in kids.
    Sanskrit is available as a third language choice and is enough. If furthering Sanskrit is needed, it should be done privately.

    If we start conversations about Vedas then India is a democracy and other religious texts and their languages will also come into play.
    Again, just my opinion. Let’s maintain focus of the thread and take these numbers as the CG’s commitment to the languages in play.
     
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  4. Laks09

    Laks09 Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    Maybe because more people moved there early on. Chennai has begun seeing a huge influx of people, like BLR did, probably only 20/25 or so years ago. It’s a bustling metro and population growth each time is amazing to see.

    Btw, regardless of what we spoke at home, Kannada was compulsory in school as a second language in elementary and at least as a third language from 7th onwards. So everyone knows to read/write and have conversations in Kannada.

    Those second gens who start school there though get exposure to Kannada. From what people on this thread are saying Tamil is not mandatory in schools. No language is mandatory and people choose their second language. They don’t have a third language option. That’s a very different situation. Tamil should be compulsory in schools at least until the HS level where people can choose other languages. That’s how kids learn the language.

    Those guys were always around even when we were in school/college. They raise a huge ruckus and work something out with the existing govt and then don’t show up until the next govt takes over.
     
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  5. Hopikrishnan

    Hopikrishnan Silver IL'ite

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    Guru Nanak, and latter day Gobind Singh may have eaten in local dabhas.
    I see this in wikipedia:
    The 12th-century Manasollasa describes foods that continue to be part of modern Indian tradition. Below from left in Sanskrit: Dosaka (Dosa), Iddarika and Vataka (Idli and vada), Parika (bonda) and Kshiravata (Dahi vada).[4][5]
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    I am sure there were translations in Gurmukhi script of those sanskrit recipes.
    My gujarathi friends say "Idaali" to refer to a breakfast food at home. I am sure it is a corruption of the original sanskrit "Idaarika". Some gujarathi's are even surprised to learn that the Udupi people in Karnataka claim that to be a Kannada-food.

    Dosa and Idly are migrant foods, that got naturalized.
     
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  6. Agathinai

    Agathinai Gold IL'ite

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    I don’t know the origin of Idly but I have read this online sometime ago. This is from Periyava blogs. He gives reasoning about why we can it ‘Idly’.

    The term iduthal (in Tamizh) refers to keeping something set and untouched. We call the cremation ground idukaadu (in Tamizh). There we keep the mrta shariram, mortal body, set on the burning pyre and then come away. The term iduthal also refers to refining gold with fire. The (Tamizh) term idi marundhu has a similar connotation: a drug given once without any repetition of dosage. In the same way, we keep the idly wet flour on the oven and do nothing to it until it is cooked by steam.
     
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  7. Thyagarajan

    Thyagarajan IL Hall of Fame

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    :hello: This ought to be nostalgic for those who studied Sanskrit in school. The image of first page of my Sanskrit SABDHAM book was like this. We called it as hand book as it could be accommodated within palm.
    Thanks and Regards.
     
  8. Thyagarajan

    Thyagarajan IL Hall of Fame

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    :hello: From Wikipedia
    According to K. T. Achaya, Vadai (Vada) was popular among ancient Tamils during 100 BCE – 300 CE. A type of vada is mentioned as "vataka" in Manasollasa, a 12th-century Sanskrit encyclopedia compiled by Someshvara III, who ruled from present-day Karnataka.
     
  9. Hopikrishnan

    Hopikrishnan Silver IL'ite

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    Only years later, those Sanskrit students would realize that the Sabdhamanjari was a grammar book of conjugations. A Wren&Martin for Sanskrit. And Panini is not just a sandwich, but also an ancient Sanskrit grammar guru. These Italian sounding* names :smirk: are everywhere in ancient language developments: Constanzo Beschi (Veera Maa Munivar) did that for Tamil.

    Whenever I read a quote of a Tamil politico saying that Hindi is the first step to introduce Sanskrit throughout all of India, I could only LOL. Everyone who had studied Sanskrit in school for a few years would only remember Rama-Sabdham, really studious ones would also remember Hari-sabdham, and nothing beyond that. It is sort of like America-born and raised children remembering "Hola, como estás?", after studying Spanish for 2 years, and completing the language requirement for graduation.

    Unless used in everyday life, it is tough to retain the language. However, it is useful to go through the exercise of learning it when young. Sort of like Calisthenics for the growing brain to learn something new, graphics, syllables, words, sounds, rules, usages. Keeps a child fit and prepared enough for using those expanded memory cells for something else in college.
    ------------------------------------------------------------​
    *Nothing certain is known about Pāṇini's personal life [4th or 5th century BCE]. According to the Mahābhāṣya of Patanjali, his mother's name was Dākṣī.[48] Patañjali calls Pāṇini Dākṣīputra (meaning son of Dākṣī) at several places in the Mahābhāṣya.[48]Rambhadracharya suggests that the name of his father was Paṇina, from which the name Pāṇini could be grammatically derived.[48]
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2020
  10. Thyagarajan

    Thyagarajan IL Hall of Fame

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    :hello:
    Yes. It is considered more complete language and most suitable for computer language. At one stage I heard it was being considered by NASA for developing space exploration computers.
    I remember some of subhashidhani Nearly six decades later. The language is rich and contains mine of life principles that touch all aspects from heaven to earth and hearth.

    this reminds me thembavani as a part of tamil in my pre university .

    Daily uttering those Sanskrit words in some form or other seems to set a kind of harmony. That is why listening uttering Sahasranamam considered the panacea for all issues and ailments that plague the society.

    Thanks and Regards.
     

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