Will India win in the long run?

Discussion in 'News & Politics' started by cheer, Nov 23, 2006.

  1. cheer

    cheer Silver IL'ite

    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    38
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Female
    For last couple of weeks I am reading abt indo-china relation, abt overpowering India in the long run etc etc. I really find quite interesting. So would like to share with u ladies. What do u ladies think will India win in the long run??? I’m forwarding u the article frm TOI & here is the link-

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Will_China_win_in_the_long_run/articleshow/539848.cms


    Will China win in the long run?
    Ashwani Windlass

    <?xml:namespace prefix = v ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" /><v:shapetype id=_x0000_t75 stroked="f" filled="f" path="m@4@5l@4@11@9@11@9@5xe" o:preferrelative="t" o:spt="75" coordsize="21600,21600"><v:stroke joinstyle="miter"></v:stroke><v:formulas><v:f eqn="if lineDrawn pixelLineWidth 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 1 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum 0 0 @1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @2 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 0 1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @6 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @8 21600 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @10 21600 0"></v:f></v:formulas><v:path o:connecttype="rect" gradientshapeok="t" o:extrusionok="f"></v:path><o:lock aspectratio="t" v:ext="edit"></o:lock></v:shapetype><v:shape id=_x0000_i1025 style="WIDTH: 7.5pt; HEIGHT: 7.5pt" alt="" type="#_x0000_t75"><v:imagedata o:href="http://images.photogallery.indiatimes.com/images/spacer.gif" src="file:///C:/DOCUME~1/ADMINI~1/LOCALS~1/Temp/msoclip1/02/clip_image001.gif"></v:imagedata></v:shape>


    There is little to contend that this century belongs to India and China. Who will come first – India or China? This debate calls for a comparison of ground realities shaping the two nations.

    Macro level first. We boast of a well-entrenched, successful democracy. We have a structure of states and the Centre. From village panchayats to Parliament, from lower courts to the Supreme Court, from small newspapers to the national media, from the junior-most officials to the Cabinet Secretary, we have a multiplicity of tiers for carving policies.

    The system puts our best executive and political talent on the top chairs that think and speak far too much. They are divorced from the ground reality of implementation. Our systemic growth and evolution, therefore, are slow.

    Our grand visions many times degenerate into weak, difficult-to-implement macro-level manoeuvres that are often without perspective. Upshot: we act an asymmetrical (mistaken often as pluralistic), dissension-filled society of divisions and dichotomies. Hence, what we plan, we do not realise. What we realise is far less than we, the people, are capable of. This is now almost an institutionalised widening of the gap between our reality and aspiration.

    We make policies for individuals and not for the society. Therefore, the individual’s interest perpetuates and some, not all, individuals succeed. Society only benefits marginally. Whether society succeeds or not is a big question mark.

    In China, the gigantic size of development hits you. It speaks loudly of a national vision, macro capability, management bandwidth and execution skills - all residing together with the central Communist leadership that rules the roost.

    From Beijing to any far-flung city, the party is able to ride over dissent to implement any policy or project. The biggest surprise is the overarching elements of innovation and creative thinking that are key parts of an authoritarian think tank. This abundance of creative approach in building a nation is the single-most redeeming feature of China. This, together with their commitment, makes everything else wilt against their willpower to achieve. So while individuals gain, the system succeeds, as it is supreme.


     
    Loading...

  2. cheer

    cheer Silver IL'ite

    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    38
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Female
    So in India, when we build one Sardar Sarovar dam, thousands pour out to galvanise public opinion, right or wrong, in their favour. But when China decides to build the world’s biggest dam – the Three Gorges -- nobody gets to know how many get displaced and hopefully rehabilitated. Whether the executive and political talent of China is individually as good as ours may be questioned, but collectively, it is an unbeatable delivery machine.


    Now, the micro level. An average Indian is a free bird. He can be born the poorest in the remotest part but can rise to the highest chair in the country. He can choose to work or not work. He can work wherever he wishes to work and whichever way he decides to work. The legacy of the value system favours the citizen, inflicting him with only softer indictments. He can be as ruthless as he chooses in his expression for or against anyone. Therefore, an Indian is supposedly in charge of his individual destiny.

    The destiny of an average Chinese rests with the central command. He contributes more than what he gets, be it in urban or rural China. For past 25 years, he cannot have more than one child. Whether he works as a white or blue-collar worker, he has to maintain discipline. He has multiple responsibilities for civic behaviour. He cannot be unproductive in work or indulge in any economic crime.

    Punitive deterrents are too severe. He may lose his work permit and revert to his village along with his family, ending his urban dream forever. At home, he has to look after his family comprising his wife and his one child, parents of both spouses. There could be grandparents too. All these, with little or no social security.

    Clearly, the Chinese system holds the destiny for each Chinese. The system retains far too much of the individual contribution. Herein, therefore, lies the key difference between India and China, both at the micro and macro levels. Individually, we look superior but collectively as a nation lag behind in our system. Collectively, the Chinese appear to be outsmarting us, but individually, there is little succour for the average Chinese.

    Both countries are at par in their capability and potential to harness capital. The demographics favour India which will remain a younger nation with the advantage of two to three decades over China – for that matter even over the US and Europe. If the Chinese leadership is able to relax and provide more space to individuals gradually in these decades for individual expression, and we Indians remain as unconscious of our collective responsibilities, the debate for who will be winner will be over before it starts.

    In a nutshell, the Chinese system has to develop into how much it gives back to its citizens. We all believe nations with authoritarian regimes tend to break up. The Chinese may surprise us by slow but sure empowerment of individuals.

    On the other hand, the Indian system needs to learn how to take back from individuals. Our institutions may never redeem themselves over individuals in our current format of democracy – not certainly in our pace of evolution in the critical next two or three decades. Therefore, the contrasts, though stark and striking, do throw clear pointers as to who may be the winner.

    (The writer is Chairman, MGRM Net Limited)


     
  3. Manjureddy

    Manjureddy Gold IL'ite

    Messages:
    601
    Likes Received:
    569
    Trophy Points:
    188
    Gender:
    Female
    Hi
    Comparison between the two emerging powers India and China is inevitable . In India the frequent lament is " Why cant India be another Singapore ? Why cant we be like China ?" Why should we be like anyone else ? The model of another society cannot work here. First and foremost is to understand ourselves, our strengths, our weaknesses. Availability of a huge , educated work force is our strength. A weak willed polity is our weakness.
    India has shown tremendous potential to grow and progress, in spite of non-helpful governments. While Urban India has taken giant strides towards globalisation, the villages have remained pitiably backward. There is a feeling that some sections are kept deliberately backward so that vote-bank politics can be played by unscrupulous netas.
    The single biggest reform that can launch India into the stratosphere is Educational Reform from the primary level. Free the present mind set of marks-driven, rote-learning meritless teaching methodologies. Get our whole billion educated on a sensible model and allow them to avail themseves of opportunities that are already here : RTI , Private enterprise, micro-credit etc. A standard Educational qualification should be made compulsory for people contesting in general elections. Already a lot of transparency is being brought into local governance, thanks to Info- tech. And our country's biggest asset is its democracy, the rights and freedom people enjoy .
    Countries where people are silenced may seem to work efficiently, but a pressure-cooker atmosphere is unreliable. One Tiananmen-type revolution can upset the applecart. The mighty Berlin wall itself fell to people's power. Fortunately in our country, though there may be daily battles on small scale,there can not be a civil war.
    YES. INDIA WILL WIN IN THE LONG RUN.
    :2thumbsup:
    Manjula
     
  4. vmur

    vmur Silver IL'ite

    Messages:
    521
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Female
    "Win" is a rather subjective term even in simple contests between individuals - one can only begin to grasp the dimensions of winning in a complex multi-level race between two nations with a billion plus residents.

    As the previous posts said, China seems to be good at making things happen on the ground, in everyday life - for most people this is all that matters. In that way, China does seem to be head and shoulders ahead - unfettered by the clumsy shackles of democracy.

    India, on the other hand, seems to combine the unsavory aspects of both freedom and authoritarianism. Any common man can violate all civic rules and criticise the government without fear of standing in front of a firing squad the next day - however the same freedom cannot guarantee a square meal especially if the person is in a rural area. Also, democracy does not extend to the rule of the local powerbrokers ( politicians, dadas, landlords etc) who seem to subvert the very notion of Indian democracy.

    One should also not forget the eventual contest that will shape up in the future between the world-views of the reigning superpower and the aspiring superpower. China or Zhongguo ( literally Middle Kingdom in Mandarin) has aspirations that reach across the planet. There is that tryst with destiny which is not likely to be too kind to either of the contestants. For good or bad, India is not seen as aspiring to that status - so we're safe for now.

    If that sounds cryptic, let me elaborate in the next post :)

    -Vidya
     

Share This Page