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Valarpom Thannambikai Serial - 2

Discussion in 'Sundays with Varalotti' started by Chitvish, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. Chitvish

    Chitvish Moderator IL Hall of Fame

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    Dear Friends,
    Varalotti's Sunday serial in Varamalar, makes very interesting reading this week.
    Please go to
    Dinamalar - Varamalar

    He says : excel in whatever endeavour you undertake - let that be your motto in life. Even if it is a very humble job like cleaning the floor, you should apply yourself whole heartedly and do it to the best of your ability.

    Sridhar, I personally feel, you have given the Karma Yoga of the Gita, in a nutshell. If everybody starts doing things with this attitude, the universe will become a harmonious tapestry !

    Very well written, my dear friend.
    Love,
    Chithra.
     
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  2. varalotti

    varalotti IL Hall of Fame

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    Thanks Chitra!

    Dear Chitra,

    Thanks for posting this episode of the serial essay. In reality I am using Dinamalar as an outlet for my thoughts and feelings which I have been having in my mind for the last few decades.

    In todays world too much of emphasis is laid on what career is to be chosen than how to perform in a chosen avocation.

    I feel strongly your job, your work is just a frame. The real picture is the love and dedication that you bring to the table.

    Thanks once again for the kind words,

    sridhar
     
  3. Varloo

    Varloo Gold IL'ite

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    Dear Sridhar,
    today's message is also so inspiring. Some years back, engineering and medicine topped the list of courses to be studied. The others who did not choose that were looked down upon.
    Now computer science and IT has joined the list. But there are also other ways one could make a decent living.
    People are waking upto this new concept also, thank God. And it is essential to excel in any thing that one does. I have been reinforcing this to Aravindh for some time now. Your post confirms that.
     
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  4. Induslady

    Induslady Administrator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    Hello VR,

    I read this week's post too in Dinamalar. It reinforces the attitude of 'give your best performance to the best possible perfection' in whavever you do. You have tried iterating it with more than one kutti kadhai this week.
    I liked it.

    Talking about emphasis on career choices these days, I would like to share a few lines. Last weekend we went to San Antonio (a nearby city from Austin) Sea world. We happened to watch a whale show, where a 19-year old girl spoke about her belief in becoming a whale trainer. She said her dream since her third grade in school was to become a whale trainer and after she finished her high school she got trained to become one. That made me think how many of us in India dream or aspire about such extraordinary careers? As Varloo said, especially parents want their kids to become Doctors or Engineers or IT professionals (of-late)!

    It should be believing and dreaming for extraordinary things and there should be passion and mainly perfection in making the dream come true, isn't it?

    Malathy
     
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  5. varalotti

    varalotti IL Hall of Fame

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    Thanks, Malathy!

    Hello ML,

    I wrote this piece because I find that people spend too much of time in deciding what to do and too little time on how it is to be done.

    And the whale trainer incident is quite instructive. Please allow me to use that in a future book or an article.

    I find a problem with most of the Indians, MJ. They seem to be in a hurry to settle down in life as early as possible.

    In Europe and in the US after the schooling is over the person just takes a year or two off only to find out what interests him. Whereas here everything is decided upfront.

    Thats why we find a lot of potential painters in Engineering, potential actors in medicine and writers in law. The list is endless.

    Indians are allergic to career change. I stayed with an accountant in England. I was surprised to know that he had been a geologist for 20 years. Then wanted to live close to his native place. So he trained himself as an Accountant and became a partner of a local accounting firm.


    Whereas in India people normally retire from the same job they started. Though of late with the advent of software there have been some changes here and there.

    You hit the nail on its head exactly when you said,

    "It should be believing and dreaming for extraordinary things and there should be passion and mainly perfection in making the dream come true, isn't it?"

    Let's pray that day would come soon.

    regards,
    sridhar
     
  6. Kamla

    Kamla IL Hall of Fame

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    Dear Sridhar,

    It is my firm beliefe that this Thannambikai Valrpom serial is going to bring you a log of accolades, if they already havn't. I personally feel that you are at your best when writing about incidents based on morals of life.

    I enjoyed reading this article. Besides being good, it also mentions my fav actor Kamalahasan. He is really a talent powerhouse.

    But let me add one of my observations. People in the western world do not have the feelings of insecurity that is very prominent in our country. A man or an earning member has many burdens and responsibilities weighing him down. In the west, state takes over the care of its citizens. Although it is still an unhappy situation, in the west, somehow the state does provide their next peice of 'roti' ( and kapada and makhan in some cases, for that matter). But in India, we are struggling under many social pressures and pride. So, to choose your heart's desire and fly off in your dream path is almost next to impossible. My thoughts, of course.

    L, Kamla
     
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  7. varalotti

    varalotti IL Hall of Fame

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    Thanks Kamla! You set me thinking!

    Dear Kamla,

    Thanks for those powerful words. May they come true. I love this aspect of Kamal which I found in an interview dated some 25 years ago.

    Your observations on western and eastern worlds set me thinking. And it leads to one of those areas which I am fiercely passionate about.

    Agreed an average Indian is weighed down by a lot of other consideration compared to his European and American counterpart. But Kamla, it depends on how you see it. I would say that the Indian family system is best conducive to choose ones own career.

    Take my own case. I was married in February 84. Barely two months after marriage I found the corporate atmosphere quite stifling. On April 26th I resigned my job. I could do that because I was living with my parents. My father told me that for the next two years he could manage with my contributing just a small share towards family expenses.
    I started my practice. Side by side I started taking classes for CA students at home. I struggled to make both ends meet. But it was thrilling experience. When students started enrolling for the classes in large numbers and I became popular in the town, I slowly lost interest in teaching per se. I quit it and concentrated in the profession.
    In the west I should have waited till I had saved enough money to quit.

    In this way as an accountant I would say that India's per capita income is not correctly reported. For example 65% of Sweden's budget goes for social security, a major portion of which goes for the care of aged. The percentage varies from 50% to 60% across Europe. US also is in a similar state.

    In India the social security costs are borne by the ordinary man. In the west Govt subsidises the cost of people. In India people subsidise Governments cost. If this is factored in India would rank the highest in world in terms of GDP and per capita income.

    Now the problem with the Western model is that the social security system is not financially sound. The experts are speculating when will the system break down. (The question is not whether but when)

    Sorry for the digression.
    But the real reason people do not opt for jobs they are passionate about is the basic risk-aversion embedded in the Indian psyche. That is slowly changing.

    K.Balachandar was a clerk in AG's office. Staging plays was his hobby which soon became his passsionate profession. Later he quit his job to become a full time Director. There is no harm in adopting this dual strategy.

    In fact Charles Handy a reputed futurologist says that in future every person would have two jobs. Through one he would earn his salary, fees or profits. But he would have another job to quench his passion. I hear from my friend who is in HR that senior software executives are now opting to work for only 10 days in a month, the other 20 days reserved for their chosen avocation.

    India had been in some kind of adversity or other till the early 90s. Security was the much demanded necessity. Now thanks to the new age prosperity people are venturing out boldly.

    And for an Indian his strong family system and family values always gives him the support that is much needed when he wants to take the plunge.

    Thanks Kamla. I wanted to say all these things in some career thread. You by your beautiful post has evoked this response from me.
    Thanks once again,
    L.,
    sridhar
     
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  8. sudhavnarasimhan

    sudhavnarasimhan Silver IL'ite

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    Dear Sridhar,
    Another good story to emphasise that we should excel at whatever we choose to do! BE THE BEST or try to rise above others is a good motto n life ....at the same time not to worry, but be happy at whatever we are doing!

    Good job, good that many more will be reading this in dinamalar!
     
  9. jothi

    jothi Senior IL'ite

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    Dear Sridhar,

    Very inspiring and motivating article.

    My daughter is in first grade and she has a classmate a caucasian boy who is not that good with studies but is very good with his hands even at his early age. His mom proudly said to me that he she did not care if he was not good with his ABC's or 123's but was thankful that he loves screw drivers and wrenches. She was very happy and proud when she said that her son would become a mechanic or a builder someday. I guess in way she was boosting his confidence to follow his dream, rather than dwelling, on him not being good in education.
    I wonder how many Indian parents can say the same thing about their sons or daughters. The social pressure that parents and children go through in India about education and career is overwhelming.
    I totally agree with you on the fact that education and career choices are open ended here in the US. Hopefully someday we can witness that in India too...

    Regards,
    Jothi.
     
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  10. Kamla

    Kamla IL Hall of Fame

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    Dear Sridhar,

    Couldn't help smiling after reading your response to my post. I know I was totally right when I call you a 'Thinker'. There seems to be very little about which you have not given a deep contemplation.

    I am not as thorough or as informed about how the social security of every country functions. I know it falters in most lands and there is a constant struggle to make it functional and right by almost every country that I have lived in! Only, at least, it is there. I have no idea if anything similar even exists in India.

    You talked about your own personal experiences and maybe also know some who have had the liberty to experiment. Over here, it will not be possible for any NRI to take such bold steps with their jobs as most of them are bound by one or the other official papers, visas, permissions etc. Not everyone is leading a fulfilled and content life, they make do.

    But the people of this country (or Europe, Australia etc etc) who have a good state support, are at free to go after their dreams and aspirations and many do. It is not like they have to save much money. People don't mind living with bare necessities. Tuition is paid and room rent is covered...by the State. This is as much as I know. Maybe I am wrong.

    If you do not have a somewhat affluent family background, how many can take the risk of giving up one's job( read bread, butter and shelter) in pursuit of their goals? The few who have done so are driven by their ambition and have become successful to tell their stories. But what if you are from poor circumstances and you do dream, but cannot dare?

    L, Kamla
     

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