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Trans Fat-It's Effects

Discussion in 'Health Issues' started by cheer, Apr 6, 2007.

  1. cheer

    cheer Silver IL'ite

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    Now a days Trans fat is become a hot topic, everywhere u heard abt it, so i would like to share with u guys-

    Effective Jan. 1, 2006, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires food companies to list trans fat content separately on the Nutrition Facts panel of all packaged foods. Under this rule, consumers can see how much saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol are in the foods they choose. As food and beverage companies comply with the new labeling regulations, consumers will see nutrition labels listing any measurable (at least 0.5 gram per serving) amount of trans fat in a separate line in the total fat section under saturated fat. However, no “Percent Daily Value” (%DV) for trans fat is shown. This labeling requirement applies only to packaged food products, not foods served at restaurants. However, it is important to note that the FDA is extending the trans fat deadline for those companies who seek a petition. Therefore, consumers should be aware that just because they do not see trans fat on the label of the product, does not mean that the product is trans free
    Trans fat (also called trans fatty acids) is formed when liquid vegetable oils go through a chemical process called hydrogenation, in which hydrogen is added to make the oils more solid. Hydrogenated vegetable fats are used by food processors because they allow longer shelf-life and give food desirable taste, shape and texture.


    Foods that usually contain high levels of trans fats:
    Pastries and cakes
    French fries (unless fried in lard / dripping)
    Doughnuts
    Cookies / biscuits
    Chocolate
    Margerine
    Shortening
    Fried chicken
    Crackers
    Potato chips

    Evidence suggests that consumption of trans fat raises LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels and lowers HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels, causing the arteries to become clogged and increasing the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
     

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  2. cheer

    cheer Silver IL'ite

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    Minimizing Your Risk

    The best way to minimize the risk of adverse health effects related to trans fat is to reduce your intake of foods that contain trans fatty acid
    • Avoid commercially fried foods and high-fat bakery products unless they are identified as being reduced in or free of trans fat.
    • Read the labels on pre-packaged food products. Since December 2005, it has been mandatory for most foods to list on the "Nutrition Facts" table the amount of trans fat in the product. Also, look for the phrase "partially hydrogenated oil." If you see this phrase in the list of ingredients on the label, it means the product contains trans fat.
    • Choose soft margarines that are labelled as being free of trans fat or made with non-hydrogenated fat.
    • Fry foods less often. When you do fry foods, use healthier oils that contain a higher proportion of monounsaturated fats. Do not re-use the oils more than two or three times.
    • When you eat out, ask about the trans fat content of foods on the menu.
    Remember, saturated fat also increases your risk of developing heart disease. You can lower your intake of both saturated and trans fats by eating more vegetables and fruit, fish, shell-fish and other seafood, whole grain breads and cereals, peas, beans, lentils and nuts. It also helps to choose oils and fats that contain a high proportion of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.
    Finally, help your children develop healthy eating habits. Encourage them to eat healthy snacks that are lower in trans fats and saturated fats, and lead by example. Good snack choices for children include fruits and vegetables, milk, yogurt, and whole grain cereal and bakery products that are lower in trans fats and saturated fats.
     

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