RUBELLA VACCINATON-once read it-Save ur child

Discussion in 'Fertility & Trying to Conceive' started by Ooviya, Jun 5, 2014.

  1. Ooviya

    Ooviya Platinum IL'ite

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    Hi,

    I have met DR.THANGAM VERMA FROM MMM hospital reg.consulting for my second baby… old and experienced person… myself and my hubby also very much of satisfied after visiting and consulting… she has explained about all in detaily..

    1.First I appreciate their step by step investigation procedure


    2.Before met doctor, they sent me into a consultation room… she is also a doctor, asked me full details reg.first delivery, intercourse, family backround of health issues etc..


    3.Next they did cervical cancer test and breast examination


    4.Finally I met Dr.Thangam… she asked about my first delivery and read my reports, then suggested full blood , serum test and rubella test.


    5.she found finally, my reports are normal,,,only one problem I had… RUBELLA TEST IS NEGATIVE… Immeditaely I had Rubella vaccine…


    She explained about that vaccine’s benefit.. am wonder and shocked.. bcz I didn’t had it for my First delivery in SMF Hospital… It’s painless vaccine only.. but its do more works…so rubella blood test is MUST for every one who wants to conceive and get healthy Baby…


    PLS DO IT…

     
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  2. Ooviya

    Ooviya Platinum IL'ite

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    THESE DETAILS I HAVE COLLECTED THROUGH GOOGLE FROM DIFFERENT SITES ONLY...

    THANK YOU.

    COURTESY: GOOGLE

    Rubella Serology is a test for German Measles (Rubella) immunity or infection. In Australia, it is routinely performed in pregnant women, because infection of the unborn foetus with this virus can have devastating consequences.

    Rubella Serology is a test for German Measles (Rubella) immunity or infection. In Australia, it is routinely performed in pregnant women, because infection of the unborn foetus with this virus can have devastating consequences.
    How the Test is Performed

    Rubella Serology is performed on a sample of blood, and measures two classes of antibodies: Rubella IgG and Rubella IgM.
    Medical Conditions and Symptoms

    Rubella Serology is usually performed as a routine test in pregnancy, to confirm that the mother has antibodies in her blood to protect against future infection with the rubella virus. These antibodies are acquired by being immunised as part of the routine vaccination schedule in childhood, or from having had Rubella (German Measles) infection. A pregnant woman whose immunity (antibodies) to Rubella is unknown or deficient, should usually have Rubella Serology tested if she develops a rash, or has contact with a rash, that looks like German Measles.
    Test Results Explained

    Rubella IgG is indicative of infection in the past - it takes some time to be produced by the body. Therefore IgG POSITIVE means previous infection or immunisation, and usually adequate protection against getting the disease.
    Rubella IgM indicates current or very recent infection; IgM NEGATIVE means that the patient does not have a new infection. IgM POSITIVE usually means a new or recent infection with the Rubella virus, although in rare cases IgM may persist for years after a previous infection or immunisation.
     
  3. Ooviya

    Ooviya Platinum IL'ite

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    Before you become pregnant

    Even if you have had a rubella immunisation, or have had rubella, there is still a small chance that your body has not made enough antibodies against the rubella virus to protect you. The only way to check whether the immunisation has worked is to have a blood test. This checks for rubella antibodies. Because the congenital rubella syndrome is so important to avoid, if you are thinking about becoming pregnant for the first time, you should have a blood test to check that you are protected.
    This blood test may be offered to younger women in routine health checks. But, if you have not had it, ask your practice nurse for the blood test. In particular, women who have come to the UK from overseas and have not been immunised are at greatest risk of having a baby with congenital rubella syndrome.

    [h=2]When you are pregnant[/h]One of the routine blood tests taken in early pregnancy checks for rubella antibodies:

    • In most women the test is positive, which means that you are protected from rubella.
    • If your test is negative (no antibodies), you are at risk if you come into contact with rubella. You should keep away from people who might have rubella. Once your baby is born, you should then have a rubella immunisation to protect against rubella in future pregnancies.
    The MMR vaccine is safe to have if you are breast-feeding.
    [h=2]Are there any side-effects from the vaccine?[/h]Serious problems with the rubella vaccine are rare. However, mild reactions such as a slight fever, a mild sore throat and joint pains sometimes occur about 1-3 weeks after the injection. These soon subside and are of no consequence. Note: there is overwhelming evidence that the MMR vaccine does not cause autism or bowel disease.
    Who should not receive the vaccine?
    • Pregnant women. Also, you should not become pregnant for one month after having a rubella (MMR) immunisation. It is safe, however, to have if you are breast-feeding.
    • If you are having chemotherapy or if your immune system is suppressed for other reasons.
    • If you are allergic to the medicines neomycin or gelatin (which are part of the vaccine). It is safe to give if you are allergic to eggs.
    If you have had an anaphylactic reaction to egg-containing food then the MMR vaccine is usually given in hospital under controlled conditions.
     

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