Mind Over Matter: The Meditation Club

Discussion in 'Education & Personal Growth' started by Gauri03, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. Anusha2917

    Anusha2917 Finest Post Winner

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    Thank you Gauri. Will try to change position :)
     
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  2. Thyagarajan

    Thyagarajan IL Hall of Fame

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    @Anusha2917 states in her meditation log

    Quote (.) Experience : last time I posted how I was falling asleep while meditating. But changing position (Gauri's advice) has helped me. Instead of being very cosy on the bed or sofa or bean bag I decided to sit on the floor in Padmasana and do my daily meditation and it's helping me stay alert and calm. (unquote)

    Irrespective of the posture, the moment I close my eye lids I am drawn to profound sleep and no thoughts I suppose.

    It is well-nigh impossible, probably at my age to remain awake with closed eyes. I am curious to know, is there a method to meditate keeping eyes opened?

    To think of the converse: there are people who could with eyes opened unblinking get into deep sleep as in hypnosis. Are they in meditation while they speak their subconscious mind?!
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2021
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  3. Gauri03

    Gauri03 Staff Member Finest Post Winner

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    I remember at school sometimes we were made to sit in padmasana and focus on a candle flame. The teachers encouraged us to concentrate on the flame and try to eliminate all other thoughts. I think it was a type of concentration meditation. In Buddhist traditions I have read of walking meditations which entail walking a fixed number of steps, sometimes in circles, accompanied by rhythmic breathing. I suppose taking a solitary mindful walk, observing the world around us without lingering on thoughts, would be quite beneficial, even if not as effective as a proper seated session of meditation.
     
  4. Thyagarajan

    Thyagarajan IL Hall of Fame

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    @Gauri03
    Thanks for your response just above.
    Doing maths like differential equations or derivations of formula in physics is impossible without concentration. In reverse now I think I was good at meditation while studying higher maths and designing and drawings engine parts. Hatching sections in drawing considered an intense exercise during my days in 1964-67.
    2. A disciple found difficult to concentrate and arresting vacillating mind during meditation. He told it to his guru who thought for a minute and instructed him not to think of monkeys while doing meditation. He tried but in vain. His mind was obsessed with thought of only monkeys. He went back told this to guru who said, "Now it is better. You learnt to concentrate on monkeys!"
    Regards.
     
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  5. Viswamitra

    Viswamitra IL Hall of Fame

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    In every path for liberation there are multiple stages of experiences by the human mind. Meditation is mostly talked about from the perspective of Raja Yoga which is known as Royal Path to free up the mind from strangulating grip of the worldly thoughts which is nothing but perseption of the senses chronicalled by the mind systematically.

    Whether it is Karma Yoga, Jnana Yoga or Bhakthi Yoga, our mind experiences the same stages of experiences. The first and foremost experience is a withdrawal (uparathi). After this, our mind develops concentration (dharana) to a particular object. Only after achieving concentration, one develops one-pointedness which allows the mind to deliberate/contemplate (svedhyaya). At this stage, the mind achieves meditative (dhyana) stage where it enjoys remaining in a state for a prolonged period of time. Once the mind reaches this stage, it prepares itself to be dissolved or merge with the Self which is known as Samadhi. The individuality of the mind disappears at this stage and we become free from duality or overcome the ordeal of experiencing the illusion (maya).
     
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  6. Srama

    Srama Finest Post Winner

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    Dear @Thyagarajan sir,

    Most Buddihsts meditations ask to keep eyes open. I had a teacher who would make us keep our eyes open and look at 45 degree angle toward the floor - it usually ended up looking at a color or design on carpet. I don't know if there is a specific name but I always put it down as simply "Buddhist meditation". I quite enjoyed practising this in the class.

    Here I quote from what popped up on google when I searched -

    "Tibetan Buddhism: Traditionally, the correct way to meditate is to look downward, with our eyes at a 45-degree angle. Open eyes limit the mind from creating mental images and other distracting activity."

    "According to Tibeten Buddhist tradition the correct way to meditate is to look downward, as if we are looking down to our nose or the floor. Our eyes should point down at a 45 degree angle."

    In Ashtanga yoga, drishti (where the gaze is) is very important and for me when I practise yoga like that it becomes moving meditation and I love it.

    I also agree with what @Gauri03 has shared - candle gazing. It is called trataka and is very powerful and calming. I have practiced trataka with a candle and with an incense stick - staring at the lighted tip of the stick. Both of these require some amount of darkness and are usally practiced at dawn or dusk. You gaze at the light long enough that when on eeventually closes eyes, the light can be held between the brows. Personally, I feel it is important to learn this from a teacher and practise. I found them quite powerful. It has been ages since I have done this meditation or any form of meditation infact!
     
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  7. Thyagarajan

    Thyagarajan IL Hall of Fame

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    #485 & 486
    These notes hands me a grip.
    The power of concentration follows much later of correct practices over a long time.
    It is evident in Chinese movie of shaolin in a trilogy of 1978-80
    By Lau Kar-leung. The monk San the in 36th chamber of Shaolin, Return to the 36 th chamber teachers importance of practices to attain perfect concentration that helps the hero to walk and balance over a floating wooden log, the rapid shifting of eyelids from watching oscillating bob of pendulum, the stare at the tip of flame top on a candle...

    Thanks to my philosopher friend @Viswamitra & sister @Srama for further enlightening their like minded followers here.
     
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  8. Thyagarajan

    Thyagarajan IL Hall of Fame

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    Yes you are very much!

    Congradulations. It is perseverance not procrastination. I envy your progress. Touchwood.

    If minor tasks or chores pending, even getting into sound sleep impossible for an optimist. I am reminded of the slogans at the entrance to a temple - leave your chappals & worry here.

    That is what am into for major part of my wake up hours. Making great strides.

    God Bless.
     
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  9. Anusha2917

    Anusha2917 Finest Post Winner

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    Dear Sir,
    Thank you so much. This encouragement means a lot...
     
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