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General cookery-related queries & Tips

Discussion in 'Recipe Central' started by simi, May 24, 2005.

  1. Kamla

    Kamla IL Hall of Fame

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    Re: Lentils?????

    They are all categorised under pulses....lentils, dhals, chickpeas, rajma etc etc etc...They are all Pulses.

    L, Kamla
     
  2. sunitha

    sunitha Gold IL'ite

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    Re: Lentils?????

    For the time being,you can take all dhals as lentils.
    All beans like kidney beans,rajma etc comes under beans

    All these fall under one huge family-Pulses and legumes.

    Check this WHFoods: The World's Healthiest Foods
     
  3. lalithasai

    lalithasai Senior IL'ite

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    Re: Lentils?????

    I guess the following are usually iner Lentil:

    - Masoor dhal
    - Toor Dhal (green toor too)
    - Channa Dhal
    - Horse gram

    I've not come across any other dhal or pulse mentioned as lentil in any grocery shop so far. Hope that helps.
     
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  4. meeta012

    meeta012 Junior IL'ite

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  5. sanravi_1970

    sanravi_1970 Gold IL'ite

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    Re: Lentils?????

    Thanks everybody for ur suggestions and informations.
     
  6. lindsaymohan

    lindsaymohan New IL'ite

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    uses of saffron

    hii.can anyone pls tell what are the uses of saffron..Thanks..
     
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  7. Huma

    Huma Silver IL'ite

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    Re: uses of saffron

    hi
    the safron is use in medicinal, cosmetic, cooking, perfumes.....maybe other will tell more......

    bye
     
  8. Abha

    Abha Bronze IL'ite

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    Re: uses of saffron

    Hi

    Saffron adds color and Aroma to food... Saffron, I guess is the costliest herb or spice if u may call it...

    ~Abha
     
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  9. Padmash

    Padmash Platinum IL'ite

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    Re: uses of saffron

    hi Lindssay,

    i have given about saffron in Games forum under plants and its uses thread, u can refer there.

    bye
    padma
     
  10. padmaiyangar

    padmaiyangar Bronze IL'ite

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    Indian food and their pattern

    Food is integral to any culture and, as a land that has experienced extensive immigration and intermingling through many millennia, the subcontinent has benefited from numerous food influences. The diverse climate in the region, ranging from deep tropical to alpine, has also helped considerably broaden the set of ingredients readily available to the many schools of cookery in India. In many cases, food has become a marker of religious and social identity, with varying taboos and preferences (for instance, a segment of the Jain population eats no roots or subterranean vegetable).
    Elements
    The staples of Indian cuisine are rice, atta (whole wheat flour), and at least five dozen varieties of pulses, the most important of which are chana (bengal gram), toor (pigeon pea or red gram), urad (black gram) and mung (green gram). Chana is used in different forms, and may be used whole or processed in a mill that removes the skin, eg dhuli moong or dhuli urad, and is sometimes mixed with rice and khichri (a food that is excellent for digestion and similar to the chick pea, but smaller and more flavorful). Pulses are used almost exclusively in the form of dal, except chana, which is often cooked whole for breakfast and is processed into flour (besan). Most Indian curries are fried in vegetable oil. In North India, groundnut oil is traditionally been most popular for frying, while in Eastern India, Mustard oil is more commonly used. In South India, coconut oil is common. In recent decades, sunflower oil and soybean oil have gained popularity all over India. Hydrogenated vegetable oil, known as Vanaspati ghee, is also a popular cooking medium.
    The most important spices in Indian cuisine are chilli pepper, black mustard seed (rai), cumin (jeera), turmeric, fenugreek, ginger, coriander and asafoetida (hing). Another very important spice is garam masala which is usually a powder of five or more dried spices, commonly comprised of cardamom, cinnamon and clove. Some leaves are commonly used like tejpat (malabathrum), bay leaf, coriander leaf, fenugreek leaf and mint leaf. The common use of curry leaves is typical of South Indian cuisine. In sweet dishes, cardamom, cinnamon, nutmeg, saffron, and rose petal essence are used.
    The term "curry" is usually understood to mean "gravy" in India, rather than "spices."
    Varieties
    Northern Naan with curry
    North Indian cuisine is distinguished by the higher proportion-wise use of dairy products; milk, paneer, ghee (clarified butter), and yoghurt (yogurt, yoghourt) are all common ingredients. Gravies are typically dairy-based. Other common ingredients include chilies, saffron, and nuts.North Indian cooking features the use of the "tawa" (griddle) for baking flat breads like roti and paratha, and "tandoor"(a large and cylindrical coal-fired oven) for baking breads such as naan, kulcha and khakhra; main courses like tandoori chicken also cook in the tandoor. Other breads like puri and bahtoora, which are deep fried in oil, are also common. Goat and lamb meats are favored ingredients of many northern Indian recipes.The samosa is a popular North Indian snack, and now commonly found in other parts of India, Central Asia and the Middle East. A common variety is filled with boiled, fried, or mashed potato. Other fillings include minced meat, cheese (paneer), mushroom (khumbi) and chickpeas.The staple food of most of North India is a variety of lentils, vegetables, and roti (wheat based bread). The varieties used and the method of preparation can vary from place to place. Popular dishes include buknu, gujiya, chaat, daal ki kachauri, jalebi, imarti, several types of pickles (or achar), murabba, sharbat, pana and aam papad. Popular sweets include mithai, such as gulab jamun, peda, khurchan, petha, rewdi, gajak, milk cake, balushahi, bal mithai, singori, kulfi, falooda, khaja, ras malai, gulqand, and several varieties of laddu, barfi and halwa.
    Eastern East Indian cuisines employ thickening agents such as cashew or poppy seed paste. Milk-based sweets are also very popular fare, being a particular specialty in Bengal and Orissa.. Many of the sweet dishes now popular in Northern India initially originated in the Bengal region.
    Southern The South Indian staple breakfast item of Idly, Sambhar and Vada served on a banana leaf. South Indian cuisine is distinguished by a greater emphasis on rice as the staple grain, the liberal use of coconut and particularly coconut oil and curry leaves, and the ubiquity of sambar and rasam (also called saaru'/'chaaru) at meals.South Indian cooking is more vegetarian-friendly than north Indian cooking. The practice of naivedya, or ritual offerings, to Krishna at the Krishna Mutt temple in Udupi, Karnataka, has led to the Udupi style of vegetarian cooking. The variety of dishes which must be offered to Krishna forced the cooks of the temple to innovate. Traditional cooking in Udupi Ashtamatha is characterized by the use of local seasonal ingredients. Garam masala is generally avoided.The dosa, idli, vada, bonda, and bajji are typical South Indian snacks. Andhra, Chettinad, Hyderabadi cuisine, Mangalorean, and Kerala cuisines each have distinct tastes and methods of cooking. In fact each of the South Indian states has a different way of preparing sambar; a connoisseur of South Indian food will very easily tell the difference between sambar from Kerala and sambar from Tamilnadu and 'pappu pulusu' in Andhra cuisine.
     
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