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Food Safety at Home: Guidelines for the Housewife

Discussion in 'Jokes' started by hasa, Nov 30, 2007.

  1. hasa

    hasa New IL'ite

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    <table style="width: 343px; height: 4822px;" class="postContainer" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr> </tr> <tr> <td>
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    </td> <td height="182" width="3%"> aa
    </td> </tr> </tbody></table> </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="34" width="584">
    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="13" width="584"> How Should The Consumer Maintain Food Safety at Home?

    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="2" width="584">
    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="2" width="584">Potential food safety hazards at home can be divided into three categories:</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="2" width="584">
    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="11" width="584"> [FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif] 1. [/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] [FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]Biological [/FONT][/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="2" width="584">
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    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="4" width="584"> [FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif] 2. Chemical[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif] 3. Physical[/FONT]​
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    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="2" width="584"> While all the above type of hazards are important from viewpoint of prevention, the focus here will be on the microbiological hazards and in that on foodborne bacteria, which can lead to illness if the food is mishandled, particularly for those more at risk -- the very young, the elderly and the immuno-compromised.
    Certain processes or handling practices by consumers in the home have been identified as being essential or critical in preventing foodborne illness. These practices, which prevent or control the "meals" microbial contamination associated with foodborne illness, are under the direct control of the consumer, from food acquisition through disposal.
    They are purchasing, storing, pre-preparation, cooking, serving, and handling leftovers. Failure to take appropriate action at these critical points could result in foodborne illness.
    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="2" width="584"> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td width="52%"> Critical Point 1: PURCHASING</td> <td width="48%">
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    • Purchase as far as possible perishables on a daily basis.
    • Procure processed food items only after checking properly the `Best Before date ‘ validity and prefer processed branded food items with product certification marks viz. ISI, FPO & AGMARK.
    • Procure milk and milk products, fish, seafood, poultry, meat and meat products, eggs and other perishables last when out on purchasing and keep packages of raw meat and meat products separate from other foods, particularly foods that will be eaten without further cooking. Consider using plastic bags to enclose individual packages of raw meat and meat products.
    • Make sure milk and milk products, fish, seafood, poultry, meat and meat products, eggs and other perishables are refrigerated as soon as possible after purchase. Plan to drive directly home after purchases from the grocery store.
    • Canned food items, if purchased, should be free of leaks, dents, cracks or bulging lids.
    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="115" width="584"> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td width="54%"> Critical Point 2: HOME STORAGE</td> <td width="46%">
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    • Verify the temperature of your refrigerator and freezer with an appliance thermometer - refrigerators should run at 5°C or below; freezers at -18°C. Most foodborne bacteria grow slowly at 5°C, a safe refrigerator temperature. However, freezer temperatures of -18°C stops bacterial growth.
    • Keep High risk products such as fish, seafood, poultry, meat and meat products in the freezer cabinet of refrigerator immediately on reaching home. Keep the milk and milk products in the designated racks in the refrigerator or on the first topmost rack just under the freezer cabinet.
    • To prevent raw juices drippings & pieces of meat and meat products from falling on cooked to other foods kept in the refrigerator. Keep them in shelves below the stand cooked food. Use plastic bags or place meat and poultry on a plate.
    • Wash hands with soap and water for 20 seconds before and after handling any raw fish, seafood, poultry, eggs, meat and meat products.
    • Store canned foods in a cool, clean dry place and as per the labeling directions of the manufacturer. Avoid extreme heat or cold which can be harmful to canned food items.
    • Never store any foods directly under a sink and always keep foods off the floor, on a rack or pallet and completely separate from cleaning supplies.
    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="2" width="584"> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td width="58%"> Critical Point 3: PRE-PREPARATION</td> <td width="42%">
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    • The importance of hand washing cannot be overemphasized. This simple practice is the most economical, yet often forgotten way to prevent contamination or cross-contamination.
    • Wash hands with soap and water thoroughly (for 20 seconds): before beginning preparation; after handling raw meat, poultry, seafood or eggs; after touching animals; after using the toilet/bathroom; after changing diapers; or after blowing the nose.
    • Don't let juices from raw meat, poultry or seafood come in contact with cooked foods or foods that will be eaten raw, such as fruits or salads.
    • Wash hands, kitchen slabs / tables, equipment, utensils, and cutting boards with soap and water immediately after use. Kitchen slabs / tables, equipment, utensils and cutting boards can be sanitized with a chlorine solution of 1 teaspoon liquid household bleach per quart of water. Let the solution stand on the board after washing, or follow the instructions on sanitizing products.
    • Before processing frozen fish, seafood, poultry, meat and meat products, thaw the same properly in the refrigerator but NEVER ON THE KITCHEN SLAB / TABLE. It is also safe to thaw in cold water in an airtight plastic wrapper or bag, changing the water every 30 minutes till thawed. Thawing may also be carried out in the microwave and followed immediately by cooking.
    • Marinate foods in the refrigerator and NEVER ON THE KITCHEN SLAB / TABLE.
    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="175" width="584"> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td height="175" width="47%"> Critical Point 4: COOKING</td> <td height="175" width="53%">
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    • [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Make sure to cook food thoroughly, particularly the meat products, Depending upon the type of dish made, thoroughly cooking would be signified by colour, texture and taste. For example boiled/steamed rice shall have grains double the size of original rice grains, with each grain separate; Fried item viz cutlets, pokoras etc should be brought to golden brown coloir at medium flame, which ensures thorough cooking upto the core of the fried item.[/FONT]
    • If harmful bacteria are present, only thorough cooking will destroy them (core temperature of product to be higher than 75 °C) ; remember freezing or rinsing the foods in cold water is not sufficient to destroy bacteria.
    • Avoid interrupted cooking. Never refrigerate partially cooked products to later finish cooking on the grill or in the oven. Fish, seafood, poultry, meat and meat products must be cooked thoroughly the first time and then they may be refrigerated and safely reheated later.
    • When microwaving foods, carefully follow manufacturers instructions. Use microwave-safe containers, cover, rotate, and allow for the standing time, which contributes to thorough cooking.
    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="2" width="584"> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td width="45%"> Critical Point 5: SERVING:</td> <td width="55%">
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    • Wash hands with soap and water before serving or eating food.
    • Serve cooked products on clean plates with clean utensils and clean hands. Never put cooked foods on a dish that has held raw products unless the dish is washed with soap and hot water.
    • Hold hot foods above 60°C and cold foods below 5°C.
    • Never leave foods, raw or cooked, at room temperature longer than 2 hours.
    </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td height="2" width="584"> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td width="58%"> Critical Point 6: HANDLING LEFTOVERS</td> <td width="42%">
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    • Wash hands before and after handling leftovers. Use clean utensils and surfaces.
    • Divide leftovers into small units and store in shallow containers for quick cooling. Refrigerate within 2 hours of cooking.
    • Discard anything left out too long.
    • Never taste a food to determine if it is safe.
    • When reheating leftovers, reheat thoroughly (temperature of 75 °C) until the dish is hot and steamy. Bring soups, sauces and gravies to a rolling boil.
    • If in doubt, throw it out.
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