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English Matters

Discussion in 'Education & Personal Growth' started by Ansuya, Dec 20, 2008.

  1. Iravati

    Iravati Platinum IL'ite

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    First, I am so sorry that I missed this post. I don't have full-blown notification set-up so I lose track of my own trails/tails.

    Girl, you did a spin on me there with the mommie and baby bergs. Then, you heightened my imagination with bath tubs and calving. I am sure the linguistic detectives at World Wide Words will also be challenged to authenticate the "calving" myth of bergs. Hot on the heels of such evocative words, I hurried and looked up in my companion guide for other young animals to infer such pangful or pangless form of parturition.

    upload_2017-8-13_16-14-15.png

    I calved, I cubbed, I fawned, I kidded is fine. But, that trout's 'I fried my baby' is horrendous.

    I hope the trouts have a more elegant way of celebrating the new arrival in their family.
     
  2. Nonya

    Nonya Platinum IL'ite

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    Animals? For vegetarians (and vegans) there is Shakespeare who offered this about Cleopatra:
    She made great Caesar lay his sword to bed:
    He ploughed her, and she cropp'd.
     
    mushroomm, Gauri03 and sokanasanah like this.
  3. Rihana

    Rihana Finest Post Winner

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    Didn't know that 'lie' and 'lay' both can be used in "lay of the land." In contemporary times, with the Presidents we elect and the leaders we have, and the closets they have, 'figure out the lie of the land' gives a whole new meaning to 'lie' and figuring it out.

    'lie' as a noun means both "the way, direction, or position in which something lies" and "an intentionally false statement."

    What does using 'lie' in this context show? One's age? That one was watching Friends from the cradle? One's colonial education? One's attempt for words to get noticed and cause people to go search for idioms in another browser tab?

    : )
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2017
  4. Nonya

    Nonya Platinum IL'ite

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    If we add a few radio buttons, that could be a kwestyn on TOEFL :blush:.
     
  5. sokanasanah

    sokanasanah IL Hall of Fame

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    That yes, English can be weird. It can be understood through tough thorough thought, though. (Borrowed, with thanks, from David Burge on Twitter).
     
  6. lalitham

    lalitham New IL'ite

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    I am a wordsmith. I have had a passionate relationship with the English language all my life. I can truly say that words are my lifeblood.

    Fortunately, I have been able to pursue my love for the language even after I completed my Masters in English literature. Further, I have had the opportunity to teach the intricacies of the language. I have also been blessed with a career where I need to use my language skills.

    I am now a Senior Editor for a publishing company. Here I can just about wallow all the time in high-level thought and content. It is my job to correct the words written by leading experts in various fields. It makes me feel God like:)

    What I have found in this time is that the world has turned on its axis by moving from the Queen's English -- the prescriptive UK English that Indian schools still teach-- to the functional English that the US uses. We transitioned to US English rules with the onset of US (IT) businesses turning to India for its BPO services.

    Those who are not aware of the two forms of English usage may wonder how they are different. Let me give you a few clues. The serial comma used before 'and' in a list is uniquely US English. The spelling in the two forms of English is so markedly different that you may as well learn a new language. The punctuation used in the two forms also differentiates them. I can provide more content on this if anyone is interested to learn more.

    I applaud the initiative taken to teach English grammar and usage. It really helps to know why you write or speak in a certain way to be confident to do so. Please write to me for any clarification you require about English grammar or usage and I will get back to you at my earliest convenience.
     
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  7. Nonya

    Nonya Platinum IL'ite

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    Welcome...Welcome...Welcome...
    This here is the right thread where you'd put out some of that love, passion, and PDA. :kissingheart:
     
  8. lalitham

    lalitham New IL'ite

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    Thank you for your warm welcome
     
  9. sokanasanah

    sokanasanah IL Hall of Fame

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    Just don't smite or visit plagues upon them/us!
    Maybe not. This is often referred to as the "Oxford comma" since its origins lie in a pratcice promoted by the house style of the OUP to resolve ambiguities of expression.
    Welcome! You do sound passionate about the language. Feel free to share your enthusiasm here and on other language related threads on IL!:beer-toast1:
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2017
  10. sokanasanah

    sokanasanah IL Hall of Fame

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    The Past Tense is revealing - for 'lie' as in 'falsehood' it is 'lied', while for 'lie' as in 'recline' it is 'lay'.
    'Lie' as in "the way, direction, or position in which something lies", takes the latter.
    The word is used in multiple different senses, some related, some not!:wink1:
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2017

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