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Dreading Documentaries

Discussion in 'Snippets of Life (Non-Fiction)' started by Balajee, Mar 5, 2015.

  1. Balajee

    Balajee IL Hall of Fame

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    Few years ago a woman relative of mine tarred and fathered the women visiting a night club opposite her house with a single word:”Shady”. When yours horrified truly asked her the reason for her views she said decent ladies don’t stay out of their homes beyond eight in the night.

    When I saw the interview of Mukesh Singh one of the four culprits condemned to death for the rape and murder of Jyoti Singh aka Nirbhaya in the documentary “India’s Daughter” which has so much ruffled the feathers of the powers that be and a section of media myrmidons I was chillingly reminded of the lady’s views. That is exactly what Mukesh said.

    Partly blaming Jyoti for the rape he said decent girls don’t roam around at nine in the night dressed in skimpy cloths.His views were reflecdted by two defence lawyers of the culprits, one of whom tested the viewer’s patience and Queen’s English with the most atrocious malapropisms to echo Mukesh’s sentiment.

    Is that why, I wonder Indian government decided to ban the documentary.because Mukesh mirrors the views of a vast sections of conservative Indians, may be even that of the the conservative BJP , an undeniable part of the Sangh parivar which has often acted as moral police? May be they don’t want their own faces mirrored in Mukesh’s?

    I think the documentary is a powerful one which uses the Nirbhaya case to reflect on the status of women in India, on how thjey are disadvantaged from an early age and are treated as subservient to men even 68 years after independence. despite middle and upper middle class women making vast strides.

    The documentary shows how the idea of subservience of women has been dimmed into women’s head over years. In the film the wife of one of the rapists says: “ What will a woman do without man? What will happen to me without my husband?” .
    .
    My relative with her questioning of the character of the women visiting the club and Mukesh Singh just reflected the dominant attitude in this country and particularly Delhi. The attitude here is if you see a young woman moving around alone or with male companions late in the evening, she must be the easy virtue type.—free and available..

    And when that woman resists the notion of “availability” of lusty and roguish men looking for some “fun” the chances are she would get raped. (A joke in the film:” A cop says Delhi is a very safe city for women).

    A friend of mine who came from Mumbai few years ago to Delhi for the first time remarked that Delhi was a “dead city after eight. Very true, except for a miniscule partying crowd, and people who got delayed somewhere everyone is back home sitting before their TVs or busy with some work.

    And woe betide any woman who moves around alone after that time. She is not safe. unless she is some upper crust woman with a security cordon/. It is a heady cocktail of conservatism and machismo .

    It is this mindset that this documentary brutally exposes. It is about Mukesh Singhs of the world who grow up in environments where women are treated as chattels and develop a mindset that you can take them for granted. .

    I am not surprised that while BJP –led government is hopping mad, even some leftists are critical of the documentary. Kavitha Krishnan of All India Progressive Women’s Association described the documentary as “anti-woman” I would have expected leftists like her to back the BBC film.

    I didn’t expect anything better from Arnab Goswami., particularly when a rival channel was to telecast the documentary. He described the film as voyeuristic and not journalistic. In his show News Tonight on Times Now he left no stone unturned to project the rival NDTV in bad light and accused it of hankering after TRP ratings by planning to screen the film, I think he expects other news channels to get a character certificate from him.

    And when poor Kollywood actress Kushboo tried to say a few words in support of the documentary, he simply outshouted her. If that guy doesn’t like opinions. Against his own, he shouldn’t call his programme a debate. He should be debating with himself instead of inviting guests to his programme. . He and his channel should quit the self-congratulatory mode and focus more on news coverage.
    .
    And please friends, do download the powerful hard-hitting and moving film before governmental jitters makes it disappear from internet. And do share it with as many friends as possible. The film deserves to be seen. May be they should give it an Oscar next year for the best documentary or something.






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  2. jayasala42

    jayasala42 IL Hall of Fame

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    Nirbhaya case which was talked about widely in Dec 2012 has resurfaced on account of the BBC documentary.( The documentary is very much available in the net)The argument that the freedom of expression does not connote freedom to telecast any horrifying item seems justifiable;But what other remarks can be expected from a social animal?The original incident has caused sufficient damage to womanhood and nothing more can be added to it by the interview.Let us realise the gravity of the situation caused by patriarchal mindset daring enough not only to commit heinous crimes but to justify the action. The advocates who support the views of the criminals can be equated to criminals.Do they have a sadistic pleasure in seeing their own daughters and sisters totally destroyed by these terrorist gang? It has given us an opportunity to expose the mindset of people indulged in sick crimes. It is high time we come out and accept that something is seriously wrong with the society and it needs an overhaul .On anyday safety and security of women is more important than the opinion other nations have about our criminals..
    At least such documentaries, though may expose the patriarchal horror of India,may persuade the Govt to take active steps in finalising penalties,even capital punishment at an early date.Let such documentaries create an awakening in the minds of all patriarchal minded men as well as women who have been nurturing the same.

    jayasala 42
     
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  3. butterflyice

    butterflyice Local Champion Staff Member Platinum IL'ite

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    @Balajee, I havent watched the documentary yet, only read an article about its content.

    I totally agree with you about your observations. However I have my reservations about telecasting the documentary. Why should a criminal like Mukesh Singh be given a national platform to "air his views"? It is as if he is being given a chance to justify his actions, none of which is justifiable whatsoever.

    You talk about your relative's views about women staying late. A large section of our society, both men and women support this view. Wouldnt' their stand by vindicated by the " “ What will a woman do without man? What will happen to me without my husband?”. What if this documentary actually spurs someone with that mindset to commit another crime because he has seen what the great Mukesh Singh say on national TV?

    AFAIK, the documentary maker got several key facts wrong. She says Nirbhaya was a medical student who worked in a BPO from 8am to 4am. The Indian media reported she was a paramedical student. I am not sure if the BPO angle was meant to add pity factor. The western media associates India with BPO! Also she lets out her name, which is against Indian law.

    I also found the documentary maker's reaction very dramatic - she has said her 13 year old daughter apparently told her she has to continue working on it for the sake of future generation! Isnt that what we want hear. Someone who thinks she has that kind of responsibility has to atleast get facts right.

    I am curious to know if the minor, who was the most brutal animal of the lot was featured in the documentary or let off "to protect his innocence".

    I am appalled by the quality of the output of Indian media these days; even this fact does not exonerate them from responsibility.
     
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  4. Laks09

    Laks09 Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    @balajee - I watched the documentary in its entirety. I am ashamed by the lawyers views. I am simply stupefied by the idiot who claims its against indian culture for women to go out wearing certain clothes with a guy friend. It's against Indian culture to go out with a guy but it isn't against the culture to rape and torture a woman and discard her like a used toilet paper. That's ok.

    This girl, Jyothi, worked nights to get herself through college. She studied and wanted to make a difference. She would have made a difference, however insignificant to the rest of us, to her part of the world. Her parents are very right in saying our daughters name is Jyothi Singh and we want the world to know her name. We have been and are proud of her. I applaud those parents who instead of hiding away in so called shame because their daughter went out at a certain time with a boy decided to come out and share their grief. When half the country is blaming their child for her decision to go watch a movie the day before she was supposed to start her internship, I'm glad they came out and gave her name and her story to the world.

    There is no shame in being a victim. We should as a country eradicate that. Why ban the documentary? Because the two lawyers views are seen as the views of the entire country? Then instead of banning the documentary the govt should be working towards eradicating those patriarchal views.

    Even today women have to think a thousand times before wearing a certain attire in India. It isn't the culture that's preventing them, it's the mentality. Living outside India I never worry about the length of my skirt or the sleeves of my blouses. In India i have seldom stepped out without triple checking my attire.

    This victim blaming has to stop. Using high moral standards to say girls who follow any less are inviting trouble has to stop. Change first of all needs to begin with the women. The women you spoke about they exist everywhere in all strata of the society. Women have to stop blaming the victims for their predicament. Character assassination of victims especially by women is sickening. Women who think they are above all this need to rethink their ideas. It is women who drive societal changes because in majority of the cases its women who raise the boys to be what they are. It should not a matter of pride to give birth to a son, it should be about the kind of son one raises. I don't know when that day will come. Not in my lifetime for sure.
     
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  5. indoc

    indoc Gold IL'ite

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    Sensationalism always sells.. and British media thrives on this single concept... they hounded Lady Diana to death and now BBC joined this circus..

    I hope these stupid brit media make a docu titled "british daughters" on the three high school girls who ran away to join ISIS.. oh yeah they don't care since they are not white..
     
  6. Shanvy

    Shanvy IL Hall of Fame

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    @Balajee exactly something on these lines a group of us are discussing about.

    though it is heart breaking to relive the incident, and feeling impotent anger at some of the thoughts.

    High time we think beyond holding placards, lighting candles and sharing a few links across, or debating about it at coffee tables.

    The video has to be shared, even though there are few points that i maynot agree or be in tandem with the director, the very reason that it exposes the mentality of our society especially some of the men's view. it definitely illuminates how women are looked at, whether it was the criminal or his lawyer so that we can work at reconditioning the attitude. (I object to the sensationalism of the video and the way it is cashing on it.)

    Where are we as a society going wrong..you commit a crime and are not remorseful about it and justify it. The guy goes on tv saying he just drove the vehicle, if my memory serves right there was a dna match even with him.

    And the other person who said he still stands by the stand of taking his girl to the farm house, and burning her if she went out late night..seriously... do they even realise that if he has a daughter, she would be hating him.

    I really am feeling bad, that these criminals thought that they had to teach them a lesson, seriously!!! and there were times during the whole documentary where i had this uneasy feeling that some of the lines were more like coached ones, where the parents of mukesh talk, and the father gives a nudge to the wife to stop, so there is actually more.

    We as a society have not yet taken cues. yesterday my daughter was quoting an incident that was happened, as she was coming home from college. a girl in a scooter was travelling beside her auto for sometime and then she whizzed off. at a signal dd was surprised to see her vehicle reversed in the opposite direction and a she watched passing the traffic police was going on taking videos of the girl,even as she was objecting to the same..this went on even as the signal went green. none standing there wanted to stand up for the girl and ask what was happening. mind you it is a busy signal but narrow one, with so much crowd around the time as it is closer to the railway station..dd says she asked the autowallah to stop and find out, but he refused saying that he will lose money wasting time..

    A change in the way people think about women in general should come from us. it is not going to be easy. remember the programme on men needing to change in satyamev jayate.

    people need to stop taking umbrage in this is how it has been all along. no boss!! it has not been. you have changed. you want a lot of things that your dad or grandfather did not expect of his wife/daughter. you want a superwoman, you want a achieving daughter to be proud of as long as she does not cross the boundaries you have drawn, so be a man in accepting the woman who has grown stronger.

    If you thought fear would make the woman shiver and sit inside four walls, you are mistaken, even if the guy tends to send a warning, next time we rape, we kill not leave evidences.

    A lady who goes to work at a bpo or a call centre, or a lady who works the late night shift is not shady. she does it because she needs to support her family.

    Stop saying naari abla hai, what can we do. Stop calling ladies who wear dresses they are comfortable in,sluts. open your eyes, listen with your heart and support her strength as fellow woman.and please try to recondition the age hold instilled attitude about women in the men folk. we are a power to reckon, and we can bring in the change. did we not move forward with erasing sati,dowry, education. change is slow, but will come in.

    To the men, Practice and preach to fellow men, your son, your brother or your father to respect to woman, be it mother, sister,wife or the maid at home.


    The girl jyothi has been working herself to the ground to support herself through medical school holding a call centre job, and standing up for her principles. and if she wanted to rewind by going to a movie, what was wrong and did she know that she was going to have to face this the day she went out. so it was not the going out to a movie late at night, nor it was her right to fight them for interfering with her personal life,it is the mind set that needs to be ripped out..

    Javed Akhtar & Kirron Kher Make The Most Powerful Comments On The Nirbhaya Documentary and yes we need more people like kirron kher to give a stonger support and raise their voice..

    If You Think The BBC Documentary On Nirbhaya Should Be Banned, This Article Is For You
     
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  7. Balajee

    Balajee IL Hall of Fame

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    The beauty of the documentary is it goes beyond Nirbhaya and explores what actually provokes people like the culprits to commit such heinous crimes and arrives at the conclusion that such actions actually spring from a general conserve mindset that extols male domination and looks down on women as lesser beings, The mindset of Mukesh Singh is no different from that of his lawyers one of whom even says that he would burn his sister or daughter if she went on a date with someone and came home late. Unless there is a radical change in the mindset women wouldn't be safe. It is a pity that more than six decades after independence a considerable section of Indian population is considered only fit for a subordinate role and no government or civil society has done much to change this mindset and no efforts have been taken by educators who just impart knowledge and don't instal the right liberal values..
     
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  8. Balajee

    Balajee IL Hall of Fame

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    Shanvy the documentary is being shared widely and lot of liberal minded people are playing a role in disseminating it making the ban by the government look pointless. What we need is a radical change of mindset because not only men but many women consider their gender to be subservient and justify it. As the wife of one of the culprits says in the film" "A woman can't live without a man. What will I do without my husband"?, We should stop thinking of all women who don't keep the so-called "decent hours" as sluts. Lot of doctors, nurses and even journalists put in late hours. Are they harlots? Desppite women breaking the glass ceiling in many fields this mind of mindset remains strongly rooted in our cultural soil.
     
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  9. Balajee

    Balajee IL Hall of Fame

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    Laks09 few years ago a bunch of goons belonging to a rightwing outfit attacked women who were gathered in a Mangalore pun that was having a ladies' day. The reason? According to these self-appointed guardians of morality women drinking was against Indian culture.. Goons belonging to the same gang attacked a private residence where women were partying. and the reason was the same. If drinking is bad it is bad for everybody and that is not gender specific. The leader of the rightwing group brazenly justified the attacks saying that they were showing the "right way" for the women. I am sure they would have been delighted to have Mukesh Singh and his lawyers in their group. BTW the Bharatiya Janata Party nearly admitted the gang's leader Pramod Muthalik into its fold before massive protests made it beat a hasty retreat.
     
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  10. Balajee

    Balajee IL Hall of Fame

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    What the documentary depicted is the horrifying truth. There is nothing ssensational about it and I don't think there is any areason to be derisive about the film..
     
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