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Asa Di Var

Discussion in 'Poetry' started by SuiDhaaga, Aug 1, 2021.

  1. SuiDhaaga

    SuiDhaaga Platinum IL'ite

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    I feel I am denied by inheritance
    By people who feel that
    Making a show of worship
    Is the best form of penance


    DNA does not lie
    You may not like your family
    To them you may even despise
    But DNA's thirst must be quenched
    Hence you must listen to devotionals in private
    Without worrying about other's spiritual stench

    Asa di Var
    Reminds me of hot weekends
    Traveling in a car
    Relieved by central air
    While traveling quite afar

    Asa di Var
    Reminds me of trips to the Gurudwara
    Followed by shopping in India stores
    Then Pizza for dinner
    Along with Chocolate Marshmallow S'mores

    Asa di Var
    Calls out to me
    It's voice comes from centuries back
    When Karma sealed my Destiny

    Asa di Var
    Such a beautiful voice
    Belongs to a beautiful soul
    Listening to it
    Can make anyone feel
    Content and whole
     
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  2. messedup

    messedup Platinum IL'ite

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    "Asa di Var" is found in the Sikh scripture from page 462 line 17 to page 475 line 10. It is a composition by Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhi, and is sung by kirtania (religious musicians) at Sikh congregations or gatherings as part of the early morning service. It is said that if recited and sung with true belief, one's hopes/wishes are fulfilled.

    The term "Asa di Var" comprises three words: The third word var means an ode or a lyrical verse; the word Asa which means "hope" in Punjabi) is also a Raag or musical measure used in the Guru Granth Sahib; and "ki" or "di" mean "of". Thus together the terms means "A ballad of hope". Raag Asa is the raga of pre-dawn hours and the custom of reciting the hymn at morning time is traced to the days of Guru Nanak himself.

    It is said that Bhai Lahina (the later, Guru Angad) was the first to sing it in the presence of Guru Nanak. The Var then comprised twenty four pauris or stanzas by Guru Nanak and some slokas which were also of his composition as indicated in the title given it by Guru Arjan when entering the composition in the Holy Book (salok bhi mahalle pahile ke likhe), the slokas were also composed by the First Guru, Guru Nanak. In its present form, it carries twenty four stanzas with a total of fifty nine slokas, 45 by Guru Nanak and 14 by Guru Angad.
     
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  3. SuiDhaaga

    SuiDhaaga Platinum IL'ite

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    This is the rendition I fell in love with. I don't understand the language, i followed the soul of it all. Sounds vintage, pure, no rush. Takes me to a time way back, generations back when families lived together in big Havelis ...

     

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