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Types of fat

Discussion in 'Indian Diet & Nutrition' started by sheetal, Nov 7, 2005.

  1. sheetal

    sheetal New IL'ite

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    I am very confused with the types of fat. I hear of atleast the following 5 types of fat and I don't know what is different among them.

    - Saturated Fat
    - UnSaturated Fat
    - Mono Unsaturated Fat
    - Poly Unsaturated Fat
    - Trans Fat

    Can anyone know the difference and can help clarify? Thank you for your time in advance.

    Sheetal
     
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  2. Jaya

    Jaya New IL'ite

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    Dear Sheetal,

    saturated fat
    A fat, most often of animal origin, having chains of saturated fatty acids. An excess of these fats in the diet is thought to raise the cholesterol level in the bloodstream.


    saturated fat is any solid fat that is an ester of glycerol and a saturated fatty acid. The molecules of a saturated fat have only single bonds between carbon atoms; if double bonds are present in the fatty acid portion of the molecule, the fat is said to be unsaturated.A diet high in saturated fats increases the level of cholesterol in the blood. Because of the role cholesterol may play in heart disease, many physicians now recommend that people eat fewer saturated fats.

    unsaturated fat
    n. A fat derived from plant and some animal sources, especially fish, that is liquid at room temperature. Intake of foods containing more unsaturated fats than saturated fats may contribute to reduced blood cholesterol levels.

    A kind of fat in which one or more pairs of electrons in the atoms making up the fat molecule form a bond with a pair of electrons from another atom (a double bond). There are two kinds of unsaturated fats:
    monounsaturated, which contain one double bond; and polyunsaturated, which contain two or more double bonds. Monounsaturated fats are found in peanuts, peanut butter, olives, and avocados. Polyunsaturated fats, which are usually liquid at room temperature, are found in oils such as corn, sunflower, and soybean.





    <LI>Unsaturated fats are generally regarded to be healthier in the diet than saturated fats because they may help lower the level of cholesterol in the blood.

    Unsaturated fats generally have lower melting points than saturated fats and are often liquids (oils) at room temperature. Unsaturated fats can be converted to saturated fats by a process called hydrogenation; since this usually raises the melting point of the fat and makes it a solid, the process is also called hardening. A correlation has been found between the consumption of solid fats in food and cholesterol levels in blood. Cholesterol forms arterial plaques that may lead to blockage of the arteries, i.e., atherosclerosis. Dietary guidelines in the United States call for reduced intake of saturated fat.



    <LI>trans fatty acid n. An unsaturated fatty acid produced by the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils and present in hardened vegetable oils, most margarines, commercial baked foods, and many fried foods. An excess of these fats in the diet is thought to raise the cholesterol level in the bloodstream



    A type of fat created when oils are hydrogenated, which chemically transforms them from their normal liquid state (at room temperature) into solids. During the hydrogenation procedure extra hydrogen atoms are pumped into unsaturated fat, thereby creating trans fatty acids. This process converts the mixture into a saturated fat, which obliterates its polyunsaturate benefits. Trans fatty acids can be found in a wide array of processed foods including cookies and Margarines. Any food with hydrogenated oils or partially hydrogenated oils' on the label contains trans fatty acids. Some researchers believe such foods may actually be more damaging than regular saturated fats to those watching their cholesterol, saying trans fatty acids decrease the good (HDL) cholesterol and increase the bad LDLS. Other scientists argue that the evidence is inconclusive and that trans fatty acids are no worse than butter. In either case, it would seem that moderation is the watchword when consuming foods containing trans fatty acids.


    Hope this info helps

    Regards
    Jaya
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2005
  3. Roshni

    Roshni Local Champion Staff Member Senior IL'ite

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    How much fat to take per day?


    Hi Ladies,

    I just wanted to share some information regarding fats that I came across. We all know too much of fatty foods is unhealthy. But does that mean we should totally avoid fat? Not reallt! Read the below about how much fat one can take per day...

    • A healthy adult can take 15 ml=1 tbsp=3 tsp of oil per day.
    • The maximum fat consumption can be 15 per cent of total daily calorie intake.
    • Fat intake should not be brought to zero because the body requires a certain amount of fat for its smooth funtioning.
    Jaya,

    You seem to be posting very informative stuff on diseases, prevention and healthy food intake, etc. Though the length of the postings make it look too much, they are very informative. Keep it up!

    Roshni
     
  4. Jaya

    Jaya New IL'ite

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    Thanks Roshni. I am posting health stuff whenever I read something good in books or websites, so that others might also benefit from it. I find it difficult to shorten the postings, as i feel i might miss posting something important !!!


    Regards
     

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