Scrambled Eggs

Discussion in 'Recipe Central' started by coffeecups, Apr 16, 2018.

  1. coffeecups

    coffeecups Gold IL'ite

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    This question is especially for people who have tasted the western scrambled eggs that is a part of continental breakfast.
    Until recently, I thought the only way to eat scrambled eggs is by making a bhurji out of it. When we make bhurji, we make sure it's slightly dry and not creamy.
    Whereas the scrambled eggs done in other countries are taken off heat much earlier and are very moist.
    Are we overcooking the eggs or are they undercooking it?
     
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  2. ashima10

    ashima10 Platinum IL'ite

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    they are undercooking ! we just cook it right .
    we are the oldest civilization and the best one !

    jokes apart : there are bacatria in eggs yolk which may upset stomach, hence best practice is to cook it properly , however moist versions are tasty too . that’s why for pragnant women and small children moist is not recommended .

    so no one is wrong , it’s just the way of eating eggs . you should have it the way you can handle it :)

    if you read between the lines i’m going philosophical too . just read news from India , sorry for blabbering !
     
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  3. Gauri03

    Gauri03 Staff Member Finest Post Winner

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    I don't know if cooking the bejesus out of eggs affects nutrition or not but it definitely affects texture. Personally I think we overcook eggs in India. Egg proteins take a moderate amount of heat to unfold, i.e. cook. When you overcook eggs the proteins become tightly bound and expel the water molecules. This is when the eggs become rubbery and 'weepy'. The happy medium is to cook eggs until they are very slightly runny, then let them rest just a little bit. The residual heat takes care of the rest.
     
  4. coffeecups

    coffeecups Gold IL'ite

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    Thanks for the reply
    Well I have always cooked it dry to the point it is chewy
    But then, probably some where in the back of my mind, I wanted some one to assure me that I'm overcooking it, so that I can enjoy the moist version guilt free without thoughts of salmonella in it . Lol
     
  5. coffeecups

    coffeecups Gold IL'ite

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    You are so true about eggs becoming watery when overcooked. I have seen this so many times but never realized it was being overcooked at that point.
    I wish India too had strict regulations on egg pasteurization before making it available for consumers. Like how milk is done! But then, educate me if I am wrong.
    P.s of late, we do get those cardboard boxes of eggs that claim to be pasteurized, but I still have my own doubts about their claims
     
  6. MalStrom

    MalStrom Platinum IL'ite

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    It's a matter of personal preference. I was so used to the 'anda burji' we would get at the college canteen, and it was a surprise to see the softer, runnier eggs prepared at the campus dining halls when I moved here. But I have grown to like the scrambled eggs Western-style, as well as poached and soft-boiled eggs.
     
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  7. ashneys

    ashneys Platinum IL'ite

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    We generally tend to over cook it, that's why it gets chewy n the boiled egg yolk turns grey. Those are signs of overcooked eggs.

    I personally love my eggs runny, boiled (half boiled), scrambled (creamy) or sunny side up / poached (white cooked but yolk intact), if it's not runny, its not worth the calories for me, Hehe

    But my dh on the other hand can't handle runny eggs, but not overdone either (rubbery / grey), it has to be just right. So it will still be soft but properly cooked.

    You can also add cheese / cream for extra creaminess.

    It's honestly a personal choice, this is how I have liked / eaten it since childhood, so am used to it without worrying about any health scare.
     
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  8. Amica

    Amica IL Hall of Fame

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    :lol:
     
  9. coffeecups

    coffeecups Gold IL'ite

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    I recently saw videos on YouTube on how to make scrambled eggs, the western way.
    I was so surprised that everyone uses butter to saute the eggs.
    It's not continuous heat, but intermittent.
    They let the eggs cook on indirect heat of the pan.
    And it was done in a jiffy.
     
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  10. Gauri03

    Gauri03 Staff Member Finest Post Winner

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    Yes! I learned to make scrambled eggs from a Gordon Ramsay video and omelettes from Jacques Pepin. Many eggs were harmed in the process. : )

     
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