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Never Mind.....

Discussion in 'Community Chit-Chat' started by Amulet, Sep 22, 2018.

  1. Amulet

    Amulet Platinum IL'ite

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    Tin has high conductivity for heat, but a low melting point. It cannot sit on a heat source without some liquid within it. If we put it on the burner, to make a rasam, we cannot leave it until the rasam is done, and it is taken off the burner.
    Not fit for the absent minded multitasker, or for making things that do not have a liquid'y consistency.
    Even tin coated brass vessels should not be heated on their own and left unattended.
     
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  2. Amulet

    Amulet Platinum IL'ite

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    upload_2018-10-5_7-20-12.png

    skillet versus oven ? There are things one should make only on a skillet and not in an oven. Like bacon or sausage for a typical western breakfast. I had given up eating such things a long while back; however, I still eat an omelette (one egg, beaten with salt, pepper, curry leaves, and poured into hot olive oil slick in an omelette pan) now and then, and then in the residual oil toast some sliced baguette.
     
  3. Amulet

    Amulet Platinum IL'ite

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    I wanted to see if Jaques Pepin's old omelette video is still available. Yes it was. After I looked at it, the side bar showed more omelette videos. Here is a small collection.

    French omelette



    Chinese omelette


    japanese omelette
     
  4. Ouroboros

    Ouroboros Silver IL'ite

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    You are concerned about absent-minded multitaskers returning to molten tin rasam on their stoves whereas I am concerned about wars lost because the tin buttons caused a devastating wardrobe malfunction in cold and brutal climes. Napoleon's rout brought on by tin buttons in the army uniforms may be a folklore, nevertheless, it assists to remember the properties of tin hidden in pest and whiskers. More worried about satellites malfunctioning from short-circuit with hairy sprout and battles overturned.

    Though many factors have been proposed to explain the failure of Napoleon's 1812 Russian campaign, it has also been linked to something as small as a button-a tin button, the kind that fastened everything from the greatcoats of Napoleon's officers to the trousers of his foot soldiers. When temperatures drop below 56°F, tin crumbles into powder. Were the soldiers of the Grande Armée fatally weakened by cold because the buttons of their uniforms fell apart? How different our world might be if tin did not disintegrate at low temperatures and the French had continued their eastward expansion!


    Back in the day, was curious why babies were fed from silver ware. No old wives tale could retrofit into modern science. Why silver? Much later realized that silver being tasteless seemingly accentuated the original flavor of the food. I don't know if the anti-bacterial property was also a reason though one does not want to be eating too much silver and turn into a papa smurf.



    Rasam in tin may taste enhanced but silver to know its original taste.
     
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  5. Ouroboros

    Ouroboros Silver IL'ite

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    When the movie title is "Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress", the hours long narrative is collapsed into just a frame of opening credits. No suspense! No tease! No whistle and hoot on the titular interjection. There it is! You have it loud and open since the beginning. But when something like Brazil comes along then one is to wonder ,....eh what Brazil and wait for that revelation to seep in on why Brazil and exit the theater still arguing on the deception or opacity of the title.



    You have chosen a versatile phrase to be purposed into any conversational mood.

    Do you like rasam in tin chombu?

    Never Mind (I don't understand the question)
    Never Mind (I don't have a preference)
    Never Mind (I am okay to sip from a chombu)
    Never Mind (You don't listen to what I want the rasam to be served in, that is stainless steel)
    Never Mind (Don't be too apologetic in serving in a chombu)
    Never Mind (Can I take the chombu back to my place)

    I think you reasonably named the thread bursting with excessive and indiscriminate choices in participation here in a catch-all thread.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2018
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  6. ragnarok

    ragnarok Senior IL'ite

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    Can you pls help find a device
    - solution for someone who is absent minded and forgets things on stovetop while doing something else in living room or bathroom or other chores and then realizes things are burnt:charred?

    any of you can research and provide innovative ideas, alarms:devices to help absent minded / distracted cooks?
     
  7. Ouroboros

    Ouroboros Silver IL'ite

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    When I receive falsified shares on the ingenuity of ancient Indians who had split atoms, airborne on flights with fuel harnessed from nuclear fission, and always been the pioneers to have 'found and lost' even the seemingly futuristic technology, I am confused what to respond. Should I ignore the online share or impugn the claim? Few weeks ago I came across an essay by AC Grayling that impressed me greatly in language and technique and tone in representing my conundrum on why people confuse 'heritage' with 'history'.

    I saved the essay in my diary to tranquilize any rabid jingoist or misled intellectual. Below is the condensed form of that essay.

    "In the last twenty-five years an obsession with Heritage –not History, but ‘Heritage’ –has mushroomed everywhere, according to David Lowenthal’s book The Heritage Crusade (Viking), to the extent that it is now a cardinal sin to neglect it and a national duty to invoke it. We are adjured to be proud of our heritage, and to protect it; there is an outcry if an old building is threatened with demolition, or a painting is to be sold abroad. Lowenthal’s question is: why, at a time when the world is besieged by conflict, enmities, and loss of faith in progress, have we become obsessed with heritage? His answer is that we find tradition and the past consoling; an interest in them links us to our ancestors, binds us to those with whom we share our heritage, and thereby gives us a sense of belonging. No doubt these are positive things. But heritage can also, he argues, be oppressive, defeatist, and decadent, trapping us in obsolete attitudes and promoting xenophobia and nationalism. And it does so by twisting history, distorting it into myth. Where history is a quest for truth or at least accuracy, heritage is a matter of faith, with its own special axes to grind. And therefore, Lowenthal argues, we should be very clear about the differences between history and heritage.

    Historical inquiry is open, comprehensive, and collaborative, aimed at getting the truth or, at the very least, at keeping scrupulously close to the evidence. It is open in being testable, comprehensive in belonging to a universal chronology, and collaborative in pooling the results of research by many inquirers. Heritage is none of these things. It is instead a declaration of faith, which makes free use of historical materials –omitting, bending, exaggerating, inventing and embellishing them when necessary –to produce a story that satisfies certain needs: for a sense of identity, roots, and founding myths. Unlike history, heritage is not open to critical challenge. It has the character of the sacred.

    Historians regard bias as an intellectual sin, and therefore –recognising the many different factors, including unconscious ones, that make it inevitable –struggle to reduce it; which is the same as to say that they struggle for objectivity. Heritage, on the contrary, sanctions and promotes bias. It is helped in the task by imprecision, sketchiness, and paucity of evidence –the less evidence, the more room for imagination –and it is protected by ignorance. In all respects heritage is a very far cry from history, serving different audiences for different ends.

    Lowenthal claims that this is not a cause for concern, on the grounds that heritage is popular and meets the needs described. It only does harm, he says, when it is confused with history. If the distinction is kept clear, the special pleading that constitutes heritage causes no problems. But this optimistic conclusion is not justified by the relentless argument Lowenthal presents in the majority of his pages, where the spectre of heritage as distorted and distorting apology for many different disagreeables and even madnesses looms large. If heritage is conscious bias serving specious ends, the argument should not be that history and heritage can coexist, providing we understand the difference, but that heritage should be challenged by history, and the critical, questioning ethos of the best kind of historical inquiry should be promoted. Otherwise the bad will surely drive out the good, as with money; and we will be left not with history, but lies. Alas, too much historical writing in the past has been closer to ‘heritage’ than ‘history’ in the ideal sense, because its chief aim has not been objective truth but the creation of ‘national identity’ and other myths. The first step in combating the pernicious influence of ‘heritage’ masquerading as history is to recognise the difference and to keep it absolutely clear."
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
  8. PavithraS

    PavithraS Platinum IL'ite

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    This picture and topic made me drool as it triggered some good old memories including the one where my dad narrated how he cost his mom her wedding seervarisai eeyachchombu when he forgot to take it out of firewood stove during his cooking apprenticeship days ..Was inspired to scribble some lines in தமிழ். Providing the link for those interested. இரசப்ப(பி)த்து !

    Thanks :)
     
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  9. Amulet

    Amulet Platinum IL'ite

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    When thread titles are long, they are truncated for display on the computer screen. And quite often the truncated titles are tempting click-traps, as we wonder, for example, what comes after "out door", "Artificial", or "Some New" in the above thread titles. When one slides the pointer over that title, it is always something different than what one would'a thought. What-we-think versus what-the-popular-notion-is was made into a television game show called "Family Fortunes" (UK) or "Family Feud" (USA).
    The host would have two families as contestants.... and would have a question or an incomplete phrase .... say, like, "Good website for Artificial...", and have the families guess the word that comes after the last one. These questions had been posed to 100 people already, and tabulated. If the families can guess the most frequent plebeian answer, they get the most points. etc..
     
  10. Amulet

    Amulet Platinum IL'ite

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    Someone here had already mentioned that NRI's are in some kind of time warp, living in the thoughts, and manners of an older generation. Some households in phoren will have old pots from their mother's generation ( key items are Rasam-chombu, Rice-Bronze-pot, and Sambar/Kuzhambu Chatti). In modern western kitchens of the diaspora-south-indian-desi, the rice cooker is not valued as much. However, there is the Brazilian Soap Stone pot (available from amazondotcom), that is quite s grand pot, to make sambar, and curries that taste as good as if it was made in that ancient south indian pot: [​IMG]

    Orientals in china, taiwan, korea, japan have perfected this stone pot thing for their "hot pot" servings. Diners are served thin-sliced meats, vegetables, and various condiments, and the dining table's center-piece is a small gas burner camping stove with a stone pot on top. The pot would start with a thin consomme of sorts, and when the consomme comes to a rolling (roiling ?) boil, the diners would add the raw meat slices, and vegetables into it, and take it out as they are cooked to their preference.
     

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