Indian Bread-Roti & Paranthas

Discussion in 'Recipe Central' started by Ashna, Feb 19, 2006.

  1. Ashna

    Ashna Bronze IL'ite

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    Indian Bread-Roti & Paranthas

    Indian daily breads are called chapati, phulka and roti and parantha. They are made of finely milled whole wheat flour and water. Some recipes call for salt or oil but I like to make mine without them. Those who use salt and oil say it tenderizes the dough. For me the taste of salt and oil in Indian bread dough interferes with the overall meal as the bread does not stay neutral/innocent in taste. Pooris are fried breads that are usually made on holidays, festive occasions and for entertaining. Indian breads are best combination with curries and vegetables. I am giving variety of recipes from roti to various types of parantha to Naans which need a Tandoor to be true to itself but can also be made in are regular ovens at right temperature.
     
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  2. Ashna

    Ashna Bronze IL'ite

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    Tools required for making Indian Breads

    Tools required for making Indian Flatbreads

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    Cast Iron concave griddle 8-12 inches in diameter called tawa
    A shallow mixing bowl
    A rolling pin
    A rolling board
    A large plate for dusting the dough while rolling it out
    Tongs for the beginner
    Wok stand placed over the electric or gas burner
    A grilling rack which is placed over the wok stand
    A wok for deep frying for Pooris and other fried breads only -
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2006
  3. Ashna

    Ashna Bronze IL'ite

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    Making dough for Roti

    Put flour in a large bowl. Make a well in the middle and pour in a stream of water in the center. Use one hand to mix the flour and water in a rotating motion from the center of the bowl outward, until the dough is moist enough to be gathered into a rough mass. Wet hands and continue until the mixture cleans the sides of the bowl and has become a nonsticky, kneadable dough. When the dough is kneaded, it will be elastic and silky smooth. To test the dough, press it lightly with a fingertip. If it springs back, it is ready to be rested. Resting the dough is the last step and allows the dough to relax and absorb the water and kneading. Rest for 1/2 hour in warm climates and 1.5 hours in cold climates. Cover with a wet towel so the dough does not dry out. The rested dough is light and springy, less resistant to being rolled out into the thin rounds.
    I like to mix, knead, rest and then refrigerated for convenience and use daily. Lightly brush oil in a container to avoid sticking and put dough in it. A dough lasts in the refrigerator for about 3-5 days. It also makes rolling out easier than the freshly made dough. But i prefer to prepare once for two days only.

    This is the basic recipe but preparation can vary for different types of paranthas or rotis.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2006

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