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English Matters

Discussion in 'Education & Personal Growth' started by Ansuya, Dec 20, 2008.

  1. Nonya

    Nonya Platinum IL'ite

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    Why would people living in hot climates use "warm" ? Would editors in India chuck that out and/or find a substitute for it ?
    Oxford. I had driven through that small town in Indiana (on the way to Purdue University). Quaint thing. In the Hoosier style of slow speaking, we'd imagine comma's everywhere. After reading that post, I noticed the avatar image of the new member, and that reminded me of the occidental face of the Comma Queen, Mary Norris (on the link ):Series Première
     
  2. sokanasanah

    sokanasanah IL Hall of Fame

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    There's one in Ohio as well, home to Miami University!:lol:
    The CQ is famous! She's been written about in the NYT, New Yorker, and whatnot.
    Perhaps 'shady welcome'? As in a weary traveller welcomed into the cool shade and offered a glass of water? Or would that be akin to 'throwing shade'? :lol:
     
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  3. lalitham

    lalitham New IL'ite

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    Thank you for pointing out that the comma before 'and' is also known as the 'Oxford comma'. Other than OUP do you see it used in UK English? I don't think so because most UK style guides specifically caution you not to, whereas US publishers insist that you do.

    Anyway, I don't think the thread is aimed at this level of analysis of style and usage.
     
  4. sokanasanah

    sokanasanah IL Hall of Fame

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    I was taught that a comma before a conjunction was a no-no unless one is connecting independent clauses. In the United States, the Oxford comma is used routinely, even in cases where there is not much room for ambiguity. In the UK on the other hand, it is not mandatory, but recommended to resolve ambiguities. For example, see the Guardian and Observer Style Guide here.
    I wouldn't worry about that. We are intrepid souls at all levels of ability. Any level is our level!:lol:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 2, 2017
  5. Nonya

    Nonya Platinum IL'ite

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    We’ve got a raging opioid crisis in America. We tend to notice the missing “e”’s.

    As in that joke that is going around in what’sup: : A man went to Thailand on a business trip and sent a message to his wife...."Having the most amazing and wonderful time, wish you were her!”
     
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  6. Tamrakshar

    Tamrakshar Finest Post Winner

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    :flushed:
     
  7. jingi92

    jingi92 Gold IL'ite

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    hi anusuya ..

    it has been a long time i logged in ... but today i was looking for something new to teach in my english class .... ckd the net and was suddenly reminded of IL ... logged in immediately to get here ... would be very helpful if i could have a list of .... difference between kind of words ... with explanation if psbl ... thanks in advance
    eg: difference between aim, goal, aspiration
    difference between team and group etc etc ..
     
  8. Gauri03

    Gauri03 Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    Last Friday I read a tweet by Former CIA Director John Brennan,

    tweet.png

    This was my first encounter with the word 'Kakistocracy'. The tweet revived the old forgotten word and four days later it seems I can't take two steps on the Internet without running into an article about this obscure but fascinating term -- Kakistocracy, a 374-year-old word that means ‘government by the worst,’ just broke the dictionary.

    Kakistos is Greek for worst. Pronounced \kak-uh-STAH-kruh-see\, the word means “government by the worst people.” The plural form is kakistocracies. Merriam-Webster says the earliest evidence for its use comes from 1644, when it was used by Paul Gosnold to warn about transforming “our well-temperd Monarchy into a mad kinde of Kakistocracy.”

    How sadly apt!
     
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  9. Iravati

    Iravati Platinum IL'ite

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    Few years ago, I read on article on inception of words that insinuate meaning through sound than semantics. I wasn't able to seek that article this morning but the closest in sentiment to convey my lapsed memory is Sound Symbolism -> Phonestheme. I will try to find that article later. The article worded the study or syndrome in reproducible and lay terms and not something as scholastic as Grelling–Nelson paradox.

    Kakistocracy almost sounds like a Kraken risen from the ashes of Krakatoa for its predatory stomp in a democratic state. In any case, such badass visual is a complicit mnemonic.

    I am easily bemused by words even something as unexceptional as "cutting class". Incidentally, there's a Brad Pitt at his seductive grin movie Cutting Class (1989). Growing up in India, it was "bunking class". But when Rita tells Frank in "Educating Rita" play that she has no intention to cut class, I am BEMUSED! Did we endorse "cutting" as "bunking" in India? Since my bemused find, I have been splashing "cutting" in every contrived talk. 'Don't try to cut assignments with me'.

    Kakistos may ruthlessly exploit the democratic origins of speech and thoughts, but as intimidating it may sound, nice to witness well-intended Aristos for the revival of forlorn EM. Could not have 'cut' this refreshing uplift as unappreciated.
     
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  10. kaniths

    kaniths IL Hall of Fame

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    I stumbled upon the word 'sniglet' today. I had no clue, even wondered if its something an urban dictionary word. A quick google search and I'm surprised to learn about it's existence since 1982, first introduced by Comedian Rich Hall on HBO comedy show, Not Necessarily the News.

    Sniglets are "any word that doesn’t appear in the dictionary but should”. Crowdfunded words (like the case of urban dictionary indeed) in the pre internet era I suppose.

    Example : Knimpel: n. The missing last piece of a jigsaw puzzle.

    Search also spit out number of enthusiast's blogs with interesting sniglets collections, I enjoyed particularly these foodie terms.

    Twinkidue: n. The residue on the inside of the wrapper that every junk food addict eventually gets to.

    Lub: n. The small deposit of spinach that lodges itself between one’s teeth.

    Blotch: v. To slap the bottom of a ketchup bottle with increasing intensity.

    Lol! Funky! :grinning:

    Also... Portmanteaus are the most popular type of sniglet, and are such a regular part of day-to-day conversation that we take them for granted within contexts ranging from current events (Brexit), to celebrity couples (Kimye), to cuisine (cronut), to entertainment (podcast). The word internet is itself a portmanteau of “international” and “network”. Cool! :sunglasses:

    I searched here on IL but didn't find any posts so thought to share. :blush:

    Book : https://archive.org/details/snigletssniglita00hall
     
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