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Delay in speech

Discussion in 'Toddlers' started by kalpsadit, Oct 4, 2006.

  1. kalpsadit

    kalpsadit New IL'ite

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    Hi,

    My two year old son hasn't started speaking as yet except for few words like mama, papa, thatha, taxi, thnx. But he understands what we speak. My friend's son has not even completed 2 yrs but started telling slokas, rhymes and speaks nicely. I'm very worried. Can someone tell me if there is any problem with my child
     
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  2. kanmani

    kanmani Junior IL'ite

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    No need to worry!

    Hi Kalpsadit,

    My nephew had the same problem. He started speaking one or two words only when he completed 3 years. My sis actually took him to an ENT specialist and Psychiatrist to check and see if something is bothering him from trying to speak. But it was found everything was normal with him and they said generally boys start talking little late compared to girls. (Now do you understand why girls are said to be talkative? :mrgreen: ).

    It is adviced that we keep talking to the kids normally irrespective of whether they understand everything or reply back. We should not make sounds like them in response to the sounds they make or broken words they utter.

    Don't worry, your son will soon start talking to the extent of you saying 'Shhhhh...quiet'. Good luck.

    K.
     
  3. kalpsadit

    kalpsadit New IL'ite

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    thnx kanmani, ur words are really comforting me. Infact till I met my friend's son, I didn't worry much bcos my son is active in all the other aspects. I look forward to him speaking soon. thnx once again
     
  4. So Sure

    So Sure Senior IL'ite

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    Very common... don't worry!!

    hi Kalpsadit,

    Like Kanmani said, it is very common for boys. My nephew too was like your son. My sister too took him to all specialists. The doctors asked my sister to make my nephew ask questions. Don't give anything (food, toys etc) until he asks. when he wants something... he points at it... pretend you don't understand what he wants. Make him express himself in words. If he doesn't know the word, you can say it and ask him it that is what he wants. If he says yes, ask again what he wants. Make him repeat the words. This needs a lot of patience.

    Communication is a way of expressing the thoughts. A child cries when it is hungry. If you give the milk before it cries, why will the child cry? If everything runs smoothly why do they need to talk? The same applies to your son. :clap

    Hope this helps..
    Sharada
     
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  5. Kamla

    Kamla Super Moderator Staff Member IL Hall of Fame

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    He will be fine!

    Dear Kalpsadit,

    I can fully understand your anxiety about your son not talking. But as you say he understands all that you say and even says some basic words, it is clear that he can hear and talk and is only a bit slow at it. You have now heard from others that it has happened to their little ones too and there is nothing to fear. I wish all the best of health and happiness to your son who will soon talk and you will start wishing that he would keep quiet for a minute!
    Just remember, don't rush him on this and take it easy and don't act with anxiety. The more you push, the less will he react. Be laid back and go about it normally. A child feels the anxiety of a mother intuitively.

    L, Kamla
     
  6. rajmiarun

    rajmiarun Silver IL'ite

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    Tips for promoting speech and language development in a Toddler

    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=600 border=0><TD vAlign=top><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2 width=588 align=right border=0>I am posting the following articles from the website parentime.com


    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Tips for Promoting Speech & Language Development[/FONT]
    <TD vAlign=top><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=15 width=600 align=left border=0><TD vAlign=top>
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1. Make speech and language learning a priority from Day One! Many of the components determining language development are in progress at Birth! Which means you can not get started too early. Remember that just because your infant can't speak does not mean that he/she doesn't begin to understand the fundamentals of language.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]2. Hearing is Critical to Normal Language Development. It has now been proposed that all newborns be screened for hearing at birth. Even if your child's hearing appears normal at birth - ear infections and allergies can easily compromise hearing in the first few years of life. Despite claims made by some physicians - it is sometimes difficult to spot fluid in the ear by looking into a child's ear. Allergies can congest the inner ear without telltale signs of redness. If you suspect hearing problems, a visit to an audiologist is highly recommended. Untreated hearing loss often leads to language delays, but fortunately it is usually treatable. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]3. Receptive (understood) Language almost always exceeds Expressive (spoken) Language. This means that many babies are actually a few steps ahead of where their parents believe they are, linguistically speaking. Be a good observer of your child and you'll have a better feel for his or her level of language learning. Your baby will probably begin to understand that specific words correspond to specific objects between 4 and 7 months of age. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]4. Your Interactions with Your Child are the Most Important Components of Language Development. Begin speaking to your child early, and converse with your child often. Your positive and loving interactions are critical to your baby's social, emotional and intellectual development. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]5. Respond to Your Baby's attempts at Communication. Encourage your child's vocalizations. You can play an early game of imitation with soft vowel sounds with your baby. Encourage your baby to make vowel-like and consonant-vowel sounds such as "ma," "da," and "ba." Reinforce attempts at communication by maintaining eye contact, responding with speech, and imitating your baby's vocalizations. Speak to your infant as you go about your everyday routine.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]6. Use Verbal Labeling with Your Baby. Verbal labeling means pointing out and naming objects for your child. You can use books to do this, and you can do this as you walk around with your child. Point to and name objects for your child. This is a very important component of language learning for your child and can be an incredibly effective way to teach new words. For example if you see a dog say something like " Look… A Dog. That's a big dog" as you point to the dog. The Baby BumbleBee Vocabulary Builder videos utilize verbal labeling to enhance language development. Click here to learn more about the Bee Smart Baby, Vocabulary Builder video series.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]7. Play Interactive Games with Your Child. Teach your baby to imitate you as you clap, throw kisses, Wave Bye Bye etc. Play hand and finger games such as pat-a-cake, peek-a-boo, and the itsy-bitsy-spider. Hide objects from your baby and have her find them. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]8. Talk to Your Baby. Talk as you bathe, feed, carry, and dress your baby. Talk about what you are doing and about the people, place and things around you. Identify colors for your baby. Count things with your baby. Identify animal sounds for your baby. Many babies can "moo" before they speak! [/FONT]​
     
  7. hippo

    hippo New IL'ite

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    speech problem of a 3 year old

    my son is going to be 3 in feburary...all his milestones are bit delayed ...he crawled at 9 months , walked at 18 months (without support), he started
    speaking at 2.3yrs , his vocabulary consists of 200-300 words but no
    sentences...we have send him to a playschool , he has learned 1-20
    and alphabets from playschool.If u ask him questions what is ur name ,
    age , school name,how do u go to school, all answers are monosyllables...if he wants me to change TV channels, he will say "ma,change " and point towards TV/remote.. I am asking him say " ma,change the channel "...but
    he tries to speak only in monosyllables...he is quite alert, fully toilet trained , can identify all body parts, name most of the animals ... i long for the day to come he will speak some sentences...when i visit his playschool, some kids
    speak so fluently...i visited a speech therapist who feel our child is
    lazy and we have to give him some more TIME...any tips on how to
    encourage small sentences would be higly helpful
     
  8. nithya prabha

    nithya prabha Bronze IL'ite

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    Dear hippo,
    Dont worry first.be free.remember that all the fingers are not the same ,so as the children.you said your child is only 3yrs.he is able to identify everything ,so nothing to worry,i suppose.he is going to school now, and so dont expect the result immediately.i think he will pick up,surely.but the thing is pls. dont squeeze your head or the child at any cost.try some other methods, like join him with some kids for playing and might be he will try to speak as the other kids.but the boys,like to play only.
    you are worrying for this, but my kid is 6 yrs.he doesnt know things as the other kids in his class know.that too the girls ...........they are just splendid,responsible,studious.but the boys are just the opposite.it is bit difficult to take care of boys becoz they r playful and very careless. so,we ,mothers need patience.thats it. all the best dont worry he will pick up.adopt some other methods for teaching.bye take care.

    nithya
     
  9. sunitha

    sunitha Gold IL'ite

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    Dear Hippo

    Please do not worry.I have heard my MIL say that my husband started talking only at the age of 3.Boys are generally a bit slow in talking.My son too started making sentences only around 3 yrs of age.Now he is 4,talks so much that I just want to say 'Oh,stop it will you!'
     
  10. selviik

    selviik Senior IL'ite

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    Dear Hippo,

    First of all, Keep your spirits high.No need to worry.I m saying this bcoz i have gone thru the same situation with my son who is now 3& 1/2 years old .Though he was keeping up with his milestone developments(physical) he was very slow when it came to speech.He used to talk even the monosyllables unintelligilbe.My niece and nephew r abt the same age as him but they were already fluent.So i was very much worried then but now the situation has changed.He has started talking too much that even sometimes i wonder where did get those words from?.It all happened few months exactly after he turned 3.So dont be worried abt your son.Give him some time.Meanwhile do all that u cud do to make him talk often neverthless its a monosyllable.Read him small stories atleast once a day.Even if it is the same story book that wud help him to grasp the fluency in words and eventually aid in making the sentences of his own.

    Hope my thoughts wud help u feel better.Good luck in your attempts.Keep going.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2007

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