1. How to Build Positivity in Married Life? : Click Here
    Dismiss Notice
  2. What can you teach someone online? Tell us here!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. If someone taught you via skype, what would you want to learn? Tell us here!
    Dismiss Notice

Annoyed With Mil

Discussion in 'Relationship With In-Laws' started by Shivika992, Jan 8, 2020.

  1. Sunshine04

    Sunshine04 Platinum IL'ite

    Messages:
    2,091
    Likes Received:
    2,620
    Trophy Points:
    283
    Gender:
    Female
    Oh yeah!!!
     
  2. anurakka

    anurakka New IL'ite

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Hi ...you please keep yourself closer to ur sil ...so that ur mil may not think or talk badly or abusive words abt u in future ....your sil will also treat you like her sister ...
     
    Amulet likes this.
  3. ragzz

    ragzz Silver IL'ite

    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    99
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Gender:
    Female
    This is going to lead to an endless barrage of counter posts now /popcorn
     
  4. Amulet

    Amulet IL Hall of Fame

    Messages:
    3,099
    Likes Received:
    4,979
    Trophy Points:
    308
    Gender:
    Female
    How to Be a Stoic
    Born nearly two thousand years before Darwin and Freud, Epictetus seems to have anticipated a way out of their prisons.
    By Elif Batuman

    December 11, 2016

    • [​IMG]
      Illustration by Jasu Hu

      The Stoic philosopher Epictetus was born a slave, around 55 A.D., in the Greco-Roman spa town of Hierapolis—present-day Pamukkale, Turkey. I first encountered his teachings in 2011, shortly after moving from San Francisco to Istanbul. I lived alone on a university campus in a forest. In the midst of a troubled long-distance relationship, I sometimes went days without talking to anyone but my boyfriend’s disembodied head on Skype. I was demoralized by Turkish politics, which made both secularists and religious people feel like victims. If you were a woman, no matter what you were wearing—décolleté or a head scarf—someone would give you a dirty look.

      The first line of Epictetus’ manual of ethical advice, the Enchiridion—“Some things are in our control and others not”—made me feel that a weight was being lifted off my chest. For Epictetus, the only thing we can totally control, and therefore the only thing we should ever worry about, is our own judgment about what is good. If we desire money, health, sex, or reputation, we will inevitably be unhappy. If we genuinely wish to avoid poverty, sickness, loneliness, and obscurity, we will live in constant anxiety and frustration. Of course, fear and desire are unavoidable. Everyone feels those flashes of dread or anticipation. Being a Stoic means interrogating those flashes: asking whether they apply to things outside your control and, if they do, being “ready with the reaction ‘Then it’s none of my concern.’ ”

      Reading Epictetus, I realized that most of the pain in my life came not from any actual privations or insults but, rather, from the shame of thinking that they could have been avoided. Wasn’t it my fault that I lived in such isolation, that meaning continued to elude me, that my love life was a shambles? When I read that nobody should ever feel ashamed to be alone or to be in a crowd, I realized that I often felt ashamed of both of those things. Epictetus’ advice: when alone, “call it peace and liberty, and consider yourself the gods’ equal”; in a crowd, think of yourself as a guest at an enormous party, and celebrate the best you can.

      Epictetus also won me over with his tone, which was that of an enraged athletics coach. If you want to become a Stoic, he said, “you will dislocate your wrist, sprain your ankle, swallow quantities of sand,” and you will still suffer losses and humiliations. And yet, for you, every setback is an advantage, an opportunity for learning and glory. When a difficulty comes your way, you should feel proud and excited, like “a wrestler whom God, like a trainer, has paired with a tough young buck.” In other words, think of every unreasonable asshole you have to deal with as part of God’s attempt to “turn you into Olympic-class material.” This is a very powerful trick.

      Much of Epictetus’ advice is about not getting angry at slaves. At first, I thought I could skip those parts. But I soon realized that I had the same self-recriminatory and illogical thoughts in my interactions with small-business owners and service professionals. When a cabdriver lied about a route, or a shopkeeper shortchanged me, I felt that it was my fault, for speaking Turkish with an accent, or for being part of an élite. And, if I pretended not to notice these slights, wasn’t I proving that I really was a disengaged, privileged oppressor? Epictetus shook me from these thoughts with this simple exercise: “Starting with things of little value—a bit of spilled oil, a little stolen wine—repeat to yourself: ‘For such a small price, I buy tranquillity.’ ”

      more at source.
     
  5. ikigaiaspirant

    ikigaiaspirant New IL'ite

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Thanks Yellowmango. This one line will straighten up a lot of things in my life too. God bless you! :)
     
    yellowmango, Sunshine04 and Topaz49 like this.
  6. ikigaiaspirant

    ikigaiaspirant New IL'ite

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Shivika992,
    There really are teething problems. Almost all of us married into a joint setup face this. Several times when the MIL says things that sound nasty/impolite/ inappropriate to us, MILs are actually saying aloud not what they think is true but what they want to be true.
    Like in this case, during the years that your SIL was having a hard time at her in-laws' house, your MIL may be making a resolve to treat her DIL well and give her a happy life that her own daughter could not enjoy. So now, she may may be re-validating her own resolve and intentions.

    The best thing to do in any relation, is to give the other person the benefit of doubt and not take anything personally however clear the signals may be! For your own peace of mind and long lasting relationships! :tonguewink:
     
    Topaz49 likes this.

Share This Page