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Agathi Keerai And Its Benefits

Discussion in 'Indian Diet & Nutrition' started by sunkan, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. sunkan

    sunkan Gold IL'ite

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    agathi our backyard plant so useful one wonders what we would do without them...


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    Today morning I heard in podigai, that agathi keerai is very good when mixed with milk and boiled and then made into curd and that made into buttermilk if taken twice a day all female related problems can be solved..

    White discharge,
    Vaginal discharge with odour
    Over heat
    [FONT=&quot]Crushed leaves are applied to sprains and bruises of all kinds. A tea made from the leaves is believed to have antibiotic, anthelmintic, antitumour and contraceptive properties. The bark is considered as a tonic and an antipyretic, a remedy for gastric troubles, colic with diarrhoea and dysentery. A bark decoction is taken orally to treat fever and diabetes. Juice of flowers put in the eyes is said to relieve dimness of vision. The leaves also have medicinal value and are reported to cure night blindness in cattle. In <st1:country-region><st1:place>[FONT=&quot]India[/FONT]</st1:place></st1:country-region>[FONT=&quot], all plant parts are reputed to cure night blindness. The root is a well-known medicine for malaria.[/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]Leaves and flowers are used as poultices. The principal medicinal effects are due to the tree’s astringency, hence it is used against inflammation, venom and other poisons, bacterial infections and tumors. Root juices are used for poultices and the leaves are applied for rheumatism, swellings, and bruises and itching. For systemic disorders, decoctions are taken internally. Root resin, mixed with honey, is taken orally for phlegm and root juices are taken as an expectorant. Sinus congestion is reduced by taking a flower decoction.[/FONT]
    It balances pitta and kapha
    It is bitter in taste
    This has to be taken occasionally
    This is not advised during medication, since it will reduce the power of medicine
    It is an antidote for poisons
    It is cooling
    It is good for fever
    It is a laxative
    It helps in digestion
    It is a tonic
    It cures insanity
    It is a very satvic food
    folk medicine
    Resorted to be aperient, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, laxative, and tonic, agati is a folk remedy for bruises, catarrh, dysentery, eyes, fevers, headaches, smallpox, sores, sorethroat, and stomatitis (Duke and Wain, 1981). Bark, leaves, gums, and flowers are considered medicinal. The astringent bark was used in treating smallpox and other eruptive fevers. The juice from the flowers is used to treat headache, head congestion, or stuffy nose. As a snuff, the juice is supposed to clear the nasal sinuses. Leaves are poulticed onto bruises. Rheumatic swellings are poulticed or rubbed with aqueous decoctions of the powdered roots of the red-flowered variant. In <st1:country-region><st1:place>India</st1:place></st1:country-region> the flowers are sacred to Siva, representing both the male and female sex organs; still I find no mention of their use as aphrodisiacs. Ayurvedics, believing the fruits to be alexeteric, laxative, and intellectually stimulating, prescribe them for anemia, bronchitis, fever, pain, thirst, and tumors; the flowers, apertif and refrigerant, for biliousness, bronchitis, gout, nyctalopia, ozoena, and quartan fever; the root for inflammation, the bark as astringent; leaves, alexeteric, anthelmintic, for epilepsy, gout, itch, leprosy, nyctalopia, and ophthalmia. Yunani consider the tonic leaves useful in biliousness, fever, and nyctalopia. Indians apply the roots in rheumatism, the juice of the leaves and flowers for headache and nasal catarrh. Mixed with stramonium and pasted, the root is poulticed onto painful swellings. In <st1:place>Amboina</st1:place>, flower juice is squeezed into the eye to correct dim vision. The bark is used in infusions for smallpox. Cambodians consider the flowers emollient and laxative, the bark for diarrhea, dysentery, and paludism.
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    Malayans apply crushed leaves to sprains and contusions. They gargle with the leaf juice to cleanse the mouth and throat. In small doses, the bark is used for dysentery and sprue, in large doses, laxative, in still larger doses, emetic. Pounded bark is applied to scabies. <st1:country-region><st1:place>Philippines</st1:place></st1:country-region> use the pounded bark for hemoptysis. The powdered bark is also recommended for ulcers of the mouth and alimentary canal. In Java, the bark is used for thrush and infantile disorders of the stomach. Leaves are chewed to disinfect the mouth and throat.

    collected from medicinal sites for you by sunkan



     
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  2. hema_gladston

    hema_gladston Bronze IL'ite

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    Dear sunkan

    Whenever my mom used to make agathi keerai i used to tell her it is goats keerai why you give to us. But after reading your aticle i realized the medicinal value
    Thanks for sharing
     
  3. remyanavaneeth

    remyanavaneeth New IL'ite

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    hai sunkan, first i want to thank u for the valuable info. like agathikeerai.can u pls share (with pic s of all kerai varities)name and quality and medi value,(so thta we can use accor to d climate.thank s alot !!!!!!!!!!!
     
  4. santasekar

    santasekar Senior IL'ite

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    Hi Sunkan Mam

    My Mom used to make tasty recepies with all kerai varieties ...........she is particular in having kerai for lunch . Here in US we get only palak and in some places methi . Miss my moms food !

    Regards
    Santasekar
     
  5. suma6398

    suma6398 New IL'ite

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    Dear Mam,

    It is really good to have such information. Thank you.

    Mam, Can you please tell me what is ponnavarai seed and where it is available in bangalore or chennai.

    regards

    sumathy
     
  6. aaisha

    aaisha New IL'ite

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    Hi maam

    My mom used to make Agathi keerai often and i used to hate it .Now i miss most of the indian keerai varieties .

    Aaisha
     
  7. sangeetha1982

    sangeetha1982 Bronze IL'ite

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    I miss it too..my mom used to make this once a month..initially I used to hate it...but then got used to it and even began to like it. We dont get it here and after reading this post, I want to eat it so much..that and methi.. is there any place in US we can get these seeds or plants from?
     
  8. nike85

    nike85 New IL'ite

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    Not even sure if the topic is alive for discussions. Just trying my luck :)
    Could you please tell me the common English name of this green leafy veg?
    I live in US and like you all said I am not sure if it's available at the market. Just wanted to check at the farmer's market and it would be great if someone can answer my question.

    thanks. appreciate your help.

    BTW, your article on this keerai is great. got some valuable info!!!
     

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